The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond…

The Beauty of Red Fescue

Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England

Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.

Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.

Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).

One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).

Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond…

Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3).

Sands of Life

Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England

Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.

The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 

Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.

Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3).

Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal.

Snake In The Grass

Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England

A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.

A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.

In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 

One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal.

Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.

Recreation Ground

Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England

It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.

Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 

One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.

I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.

Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place.

Purple Scripture

Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 

Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 

Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.

A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place.

Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries.

Flowers Of the Dam

Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England

Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.

The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.

Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries.

Toad In The Hole
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Sherwood lake was once part of the wider Calverley estate which was one of the first ornamental and wooded mansion estates laid out in the Tunbridge Wells. It was owned by Charles William Siemans owner of  international Siemans Company and a fellow of the Royal Society, thegrounds and buildings the subject of his experimental electrification. It was created by Decimus Burton, although the site is no longer part of the estate it was given village green status in 2010.
Since then substantial amounts of work have been done to the lake since then, the dam was repaired and cleared whilst paths were cut through the adjoining woodland, the lake is commonly used by fisherman but is also home to a wide range of wildlife. Mallards Anas platyrhynchos (2) are common in many parks with lakes, One female had a particularly late brood and the ducklings were still about.
Yellow Water-Lily Nuphar lutea (3)(4), alternatively known as Brandy-bottles due to the shape of the seed pods, form dense mats on the lake. Unlike other water-lilys it doesn’t tollerate pollution and is a good indicator of water quality. A nice surprise was a Common Toad Bufo bufo (5) which crawled out of a pile of woodchip. Toad In The Hole
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Sherwood lake was once part of the wider Calverley estate which was one of the first ornamental and wooded mansion estates laid out in the Tunbridge Wells. It was owned by Charles William Siemans owner of  international Siemans Company and a fellow of the Royal Society, thegrounds and buildings the subject of his experimental electrification. It was created by Decimus Burton, although the site is no longer part of the estate it was given village green status in 2010.
Since then substantial amounts of work have been done to the lake since then, the dam was repaired and cleared whilst paths were cut through the adjoining woodland, the lake is commonly used by fisherman but is also home to a wide range of wildlife. Mallards Anas platyrhynchos (2) are common in many parks with lakes, One female had a particularly late brood and the ducklings were still about.
Yellow Water-Lily Nuphar lutea (3)(4), alternatively known as Brandy-bottles due to the shape of the seed pods, form dense mats on the lake. Unlike other water-lilys it doesn’t tollerate pollution and is a good indicator of water quality. A nice surprise was a Common Toad Bufo bufo (5) which crawled out of a pile of woodchip. Toad In The Hole
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Sherwood lake was once part of the wider Calverley estate which was one of the first ornamental and wooded mansion estates laid out in the Tunbridge Wells. It was owned by Charles William Siemans owner of  international Siemans Company and a fellow of the Royal Society, thegrounds and buildings the subject of his experimental electrification. It was created by Decimus Burton, although the site is no longer part of the estate it was given village green status in 2010.
Since then substantial amounts of work have been done to the lake since then, the dam was repaired and cleared whilst paths were cut through the adjoining woodland, the lake is commonly used by fisherman but is also home to a wide range of wildlife. Mallards Anas platyrhynchos (2) are common in many parks with lakes, One female had a particularly late brood and the ducklings were still about.
Yellow Water-Lily Nuphar lutea (3)(4), alternatively known as Brandy-bottles due to the shape of the seed pods, form dense mats on the lake. Unlike other water-lilys it doesn’t tollerate pollution and is a good indicator of water quality. A nice surprise was a Common Toad Bufo bufo (5) which crawled out of a pile of woodchip. Toad In The Hole
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Sherwood lake was once part of the wider Calverley estate which was one of the first ornamental and wooded mansion estates laid out in the Tunbridge Wells. It was owned by Charles William Siemans owner of  international Siemans Company and a fellow of the Royal Society, thegrounds and buildings the subject of his experimental electrification. It was created by Decimus Burton, although the site is no longer part of the estate it was given village green status in 2010.
Since then substantial amounts of work have been done to the lake since then, the dam was repaired and cleared whilst paths were cut through the adjoining woodland, the lake is commonly used by fisherman but is also home to a wide range of wildlife. Mallards Anas platyrhynchos (2) are common in many parks with lakes, One female had a particularly late brood and the ducklings were still about.
Yellow Water-Lily Nuphar lutea (3)(4), alternatively known as Brandy-bottles due to the shape of the seed pods, form dense mats on the lake. Unlike other water-lilys it doesn’t tollerate pollution and is a good indicator of water quality. A nice surprise was a Common Toad Bufo bufo (5) which crawled out of a pile of woodchip. Toad In The Hole
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Sherwood lake was once part of the wider Calverley estate which was one of the first ornamental and wooded mansion estates laid out in the Tunbridge Wells. It was owned by Charles William Siemans owner of  international Siemans Company and a fellow of the Royal Society, thegrounds and buildings the subject of his experimental electrification. It was created by Decimus Burton, although the site is no longer part of the estate it was given village green status in 2010.
Since then substantial amounts of work have been done to the lake since then, the dam was repaired and cleared whilst paths were cut through the adjoining woodland, the lake is commonly used by fisherman but is also home to a wide range of wildlife. Mallards Anas platyrhynchos (2) are common in many parks with lakes, One female had a particularly late brood and the ducklings were still about.
Yellow Water-Lily Nuphar lutea (3)(4), alternatively known as Brandy-bottles due to the shape of the seed pods, form dense mats on the lake. Unlike other water-lilys it doesn’t tollerate pollution and is a good indicator of water quality. A nice surprise was a Common Toad Bufo bufo (5) which crawled out of a pile of woodchip. Toad In The Hole
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Sherwood lake was once part of the wider Calverley estate which was one of the first ornamental and wooded mansion estates laid out in the Tunbridge Wells. It was owned by Charles William Siemans owner of  international Siemans Company and a fellow of the Royal Society, thegrounds and buildings the subject of his experimental electrification. It was created by Decimus Burton, although the site is no longer part of the estate it was given village green status in 2010.
Since then substantial amounts of work have been done to the lake since then, the dam was repaired and cleared whilst paths were cut through the adjoining woodland, the lake is commonly used by fisherman but is also home to a wide range of wildlife. Mallards Anas platyrhynchos (2) are common in many parks with lakes, One female had a particularly late brood and the ducklings were still about.
Yellow Water-Lily Nuphar lutea (3)(4), alternatively known as Brandy-bottles due to the shape of the seed pods, form dense mats on the lake. Unlike other water-lilys it doesn’t tollerate pollution and is a good indicator of water quality. A nice surprise was a Common Toad Bufo bufo (5) which crawled out of a pile of woodchip.

Toad In The Hole

Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England

Sherwood lake was once part of the wider Calverley estate which was one of the first ornamental and wooded mansion estates laid out in the Tunbridge Wells. It was owned by Charles William Siemans owner of  international Siemans Company and a fellow of the Royal Society, thegrounds and buildings the subject of his experimental electrification. It was created by Decimus Burton, although the site is no longer part of the estate it was given village green status in 2010.

Since then substantial amounts of work have been done to the lake since then, the dam was repaired and cleared whilst paths were cut through the adjoining woodland, the lake is commonly used by fisherman but is also home to a wide range of wildlife. Mallards Anas platyrhynchos (2) are common in many parks with lakes, One female had a particularly late brood and the ducklings were still about.

Yellow Water-Lily Nuphar lutea (3)(4), alternatively known as Brandy-bottles due to the shape of the seed pods, form dense mats on the lake. Unlike other water-lilys it doesn’t tollerate pollution and is a good indicator of water quality. A nice surprise was a Common Toad Bufo bufo (5) which crawled out of a pile of woodchip.

The Extinct Corn-Cockle 

Oak Road, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England

The Corn-cockle Agrostemma githago (1) was once a widespread species which was brought to Britain during the Iron Age by farmers, it was once a common cornfield weed but with the onset of modern farming and herbicides it has been all but wiped out. 

The main reason for it not being reintroducing is due to all parts of the plant being poisonous. It would often contaminate corn crops and has been found that in some iron age settlements, large piles of corn-cockle seeds were found in the corners of buildings where they would have been painstaking removed from a pile of grain. Nowadays the plant can commonly be found in wildflowers mixes and also wild at the plant life reserve at Ranscombe Farm.

A Bird With a Beard
Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England
Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.
The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).
Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves.  A Bird With a Beard
Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England
Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.
The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).
Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves.  A Bird With a Beard
Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England
Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.
The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).
Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves.  A Bird With a Beard
Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England
Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.
The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).
Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves.  A Bird With a Beard
Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England
Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.
The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).
Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves.  A Bird With a Beard
Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England
Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.
The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).
Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves.  A Bird With a Beard
Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England
Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.
The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).
Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves.  A Bird With a Beard
Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England
Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.
The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).
Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves.  A Bird With a Beard
Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England
Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.
The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).
Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves. 

A Bird With a Beard

Westbere Marshes, Westbere, Kent, England

Another early visit to Westbere Marshes for some bird ringing gave me a chance to have another visit to this wonderful reedbed.

The catch of birds was fairly small it did include 2 new species I’d never ringed before, first up was a lovely male Bearded Reedling Panurus biarmicus (4), in total 3 were caught including a female and another male, second up was a Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus (5) including one i’d rung previously (my first ‘return’ bird) and finally a smattering of Reed Buntings Emberiza schoeniclus (3).

Although the birds were thin on the ground there was still plenty to see, Many of plants were still in flower including Bramble Rubus fruticosa (9) and Common Valerian Valeriana officinalis (1). The Common Nettles Urtica dioica were being eaten by a large number of Small Tortoiseshell Caterpillars Aglais urticae (7)(8) whilst a single Clouded Border Lomaspilis marginata (2) was resting on it’s leaves. 

Returned To The Earth
Southborough Church, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
The church yard at Southborough Church is full of life, by letting the grass grow long in-between the graves a meadow has sprung up which provides a home for plenty of insects and other wildlife.
Common Cow-Wheat Melampyrum pratense (2) is an acid specialist, it is also a hemi-parasite and taps into other plants roots to gather nutrients. A single Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (5) could also be found in-between the graves, these only grow in unimproved grasslands proving what an important place graveyards can be for nature.

Returned To The Earth
Southborough Church, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
The church yard at Southborough Church is full of life, by letting the grass grow long in-between the graves a meadow has sprung up which provides a home for plenty of insects and other wildlife.
Common Cow-Wheat Melampyrum pratense (2) is an acid specialist, it is also a hemi-parasite and taps into other plants roots to gather nutrients. A single Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (5) could also be found in-between the graves, these only grow in unimproved grasslands proving what an important place graveyards can be for nature.

Returned To The Earth
Southborough Church, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
The church yard at Southborough Church is full of life, by letting the grass grow long in-between the graves a meadow has sprung up which provides a home for plenty of insects and other wildlife.
Common Cow-Wheat Melampyrum pratense (2) is an acid specialist, it is also a hemi-parasite and taps into other plants roots to gather nutrients. A single Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (5) could also be found in-between the graves, these only grow in unimproved grasslands proving what an important place graveyards can be for nature.

Returned To The Earth
Southborough Church, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
The church yard at Southborough Church is full of life, by letting the grass grow long in-between the graves a meadow has sprung up which provides a home for plenty of insects and other wildlife.
Common Cow-Wheat Melampyrum pratense (2) is an acid specialist, it is also a hemi-parasite and taps into other plants roots to gather nutrients. A single Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (5) could also be found in-between the graves, these only grow in unimproved grasslands proving what an important place graveyards can be for nature.

Returned To The Earth
Southborough Church, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
The church yard at Southborough Church is full of life, by letting the grass grow long in-between the graves a meadow has sprung up which provides a home for plenty of insects and other wildlife.
Common Cow-Wheat Melampyrum pratense (2) is an acid specialist, it is also a hemi-parasite and taps into other plants roots to gather nutrients. A single Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (5) could also be found in-between the graves, these only grow in unimproved grasslands proving what an important place graveyards can be for nature.

Returned To The Earth
Southborough Church, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
The church yard at Southborough Church is full of life, by letting the grass grow long in-between the graves a meadow has sprung up which provides a home for plenty of insects and other wildlife.
Common Cow-Wheat Melampyrum pratense (2) is an acid specialist, it is also a hemi-parasite and taps into other plants roots to gather nutrients. A single Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (5) could also be found in-between the graves, these only grow in unimproved grasslands proving what an important place graveyards can be for nature.

Returned To The Earth

Southborough Church, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England

The church yard at Southborough Church is full of life, by letting the grass grow long in-between the graves a meadow has sprung up which provides a home for plenty of insects and other wildlife.

Common Cow-Wheat Melampyrum pratense (2) is an acid specialist, it is also a hemi-parasite and taps into other plants roots to gather nutrients. A single Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (5) could also be found in-between the graves, these only grow in unimproved grasslands proving what an important place graveyards can be for nature.

Not Quite The South Of France…
Southborough Common, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Southborough has a long history of occupation, with iron being worked in the area since prehistoric times although it was once much more densely forested than it is now although the common still holds large expanses of Wood Pasture which would have been introduced with the Norman Conquest and Acid Grassland which is locally known as the South of France.
As a common, local people who own houses may have commoners rights, this gives the people the ability to collect Estovers (firewood), Pannage (Right to turn out pigs for a period in autumn to eat mast), Marl (take sand or gravel), Turbary (take sods of earth for fuel), Piscary (right to fish) and Pasture (graze animals) although very few people still excise these rights nowadays. 
The acid grassland is currently under threat from Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (1) which is shading out some of the more specialist plants, although one species which rely on bracken could also be found, the Brown Silver-Line Moth Petrophora chlorosata (2) caterpillars feed on the leaves. Although in clear areas Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (8) a low growing plant, with tiny white flowers which look like fallen snow was in full flower along with Meadow Vetchling Lathyrus pratensis (3).
In one patch a small area of Heath Calluna vulgaris (4) has re-established itself and was home to a good number of Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (5) which were probably the pray for the large number of Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara (6)(7) which could also be found basking in the sun. Not Quite The South Of France…
Southborough Common, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Southborough has a long history of occupation, with iron being worked in the area since prehistoric times although it was once much more densely forested than it is now although the common still holds large expanses of Wood Pasture which would have been introduced with the Norman Conquest and Acid Grassland which is locally known as the South of France.
As a common, local people who own houses may have commoners rights, this gives the people the ability to collect Estovers (firewood), Pannage (Right to turn out pigs for a period in autumn to eat mast), Marl (take sand or gravel), Turbary (take sods of earth for fuel), Piscary (right to fish) and Pasture (graze animals) although very few people still excise these rights nowadays. 
The acid grassland is currently under threat from Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (1) which is shading out some of the more specialist plants, although one species which rely on bracken could also be found, the Brown Silver-Line Moth Petrophora chlorosata (2) caterpillars feed on the leaves. Although in clear areas Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (8) a low growing plant, with tiny white flowers which look like fallen snow was in full flower along with Meadow Vetchling Lathyrus pratensis (3).
In one patch a small area of Heath Calluna vulgaris (4) has re-established itself and was home to a good number of Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (5) which were probably the pray for the large number of Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara (6)(7) which could also be found basking in the sun. Not Quite The South Of France…
Southborough Common, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Southborough has a long history of occupation, with iron being worked in the area since prehistoric times although it was once much more densely forested than it is now although the common still holds large expanses of Wood Pasture which would have been introduced with the Norman Conquest and Acid Grassland which is locally known as the South of France.
As a common, local people who own houses may have commoners rights, this gives the people the ability to collect Estovers (firewood), Pannage (Right to turn out pigs for a period in autumn to eat mast), Marl (take sand or gravel), Turbary (take sods of earth for fuel), Piscary (right to fish) and Pasture (graze animals) although very few people still excise these rights nowadays. 
The acid grassland is currently under threat from Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (1) which is shading out some of the more specialist plants, although one species which rely on bracken could also be found, the Brown Silver-Line Moth Petrophora chlorosata (2) caterpillars feed on the leaves. Although in clear areas Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (8) a low growing plant, with tiny white flowers which look like fallen snow was in full flower along with Meadow Vetchling Lathyrus pratensis (3).
In one patch a small area of Heath Calluna vulgaris (4) has re-established itself and was home to a good number of Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (5) which were probably the pray for the large number of Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara (6)(7) which could also be found basking in the sun. Not Quite The South Of France…
Southborough Common, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Southborough has a long history of occupation, with iron being worked in the area since prehistoric times although it was once much more densely forested than it is now although the common still holds large expanses of Wood Pasture which would have been introduced with the Norman Conquest and Acid Grassland which is locally known as the South of France.
As a common, local people who own houses may have commoners rights, this gives the people the ability to collect Estovers (firewood), Pannage (Right to turn out pigs for a period in autumn to eat mast), Marl (take sand or gravel), Turbary (take sods of earth for fuel), Piscary (right to fish) and Pasture (graze animals) although very few people still excise these rights nowadays. 
The acid grassland is currently under threat from Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (1) which is shading out some of the more specialist plants, although one species which rely on bracken could also be found, the Brown Silver-Line Moth Petrophora chlorosata (2) caterpillars feed on the leaves. Although in clear areas Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (8) a low growing plant, with tiny white flowers which look like fallen snow was in full flower along with Meadow Vetchling Lathyrus pratensis (3).
In one patch a small area of Heath Calluna vulgaris (4) has re-established itself and was home to a good number of Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (5) which were probably the pray for the large number of Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara (6)(7) which could also be found basking in the sun. Not Quite The South Of France…
Southborough Common, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Southborough has a long history of occupation, with iron being worked in the area since prehistoric times although it was once much more densely forested than it is now although the common still holds large expanses of Wood Pasture which would have been introduced with the Norman Conquest and Acid Grassland which is locally known as the South of France.
As a common, local people who own houses may have commoners rights, this gives the people the ability to collect Estovers (firewood), Pannage (Right to turn out pigs for a period in autumn to eat mast), Marl (take sand or gravel), Turbary (take sods of earth for fuel), Piscary (right to fish) and Pasture (graze animals) although very few people still excise these rights nowadays. 
The acid grassland is currently under threat from Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (1) which is shading out some of the more specialist plants, although one species which rely on bracken could also be found, the Brown Silver-Line Moth Petrophora chlorosata (2) caterpillars feed on the leaves. Although in clear areas Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (8) a low growing plant, with tiny white flowers which look like fallen snow was in full flower along with Meadow Vetchling Lathyrus pratensis (3).
In one patch a small area of Heath Calluna vulgaris (4) has re-established itself and was home to a good number of Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (5) which were probably the pray for the large number of Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara (6)(7) which could also be found basking in the sun. Not Quite The South Of France…
Southborough Common, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Southborough has a long history of occupation, with iron being worked in the area since prehistoric times although it was once much more densely forested than it is now although the common still holds large expanses of Wood Pasture which would have been introduced with the Norman Conquest and Acid Grassland which is locally known as the South of France.
As a common, local people who own houses may have commoners rights, this gives the people the ability to collect Estovers (firewood), Pannage (Right to turn out pigs for a period in autumn to eat mast), Marl (take sand or gravel), Turbary (take sods of earth for fuel), Piscary (right to fish) and Pasture (graze animals) although very few people still excise these rights nowadays. 
The acid grassland is currently under threat from Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (1) which is shading out some of the more specialist plants, although one species which rely on bracken could also be found, the Brown Silver-Line Moth Petrophora chlorosata (2) caterpillars feed on the leaves. Although in clear areas Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (8) a low growing plant, with tiny white flowers which look like fallen snow was in full flower along with Meadow Vetchling Lathyrus pratensis (3).
In one patch a small area of Heath Calluna vulgaris (4) has re-established itself and was home to a good number of Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (5) which were probably the pray for the large number of Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara (6)(7) which could also be found basking in the sun. Not Quite The South Of France…
Southborough Common, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Southborough has a long history of occupation, with iron being worked in the area since prehistoric times although it was once much more densely forested than it is now although the common still holds large expanses of Wood Pasture which would have been introduced with the Norman Conquest and Acid Grassland which is locally known as the South of France.
As a common, local people who own houses may have commoners rights, this gives the people the ability to collect Estovers (firewood), Pannage (Right to turn out pigs for a period in autumn to eat mast), Marl (take sand or gravel), Turbary (take sods of earth for fuel), Piscary (right to fish) and Pasture (graze animals) although very few people still excise these rights nowadays. 
The acid grassland is currently under threat from Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (1) which is shading out some of the more specialist plants, although one species which rely on bracken could also be found, the Brown Silver-Line Moth Petrophora chlorosata (2) caterpillars feed on the leaves. Although in clear areas Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (8) a low growing plant, with tiny white flowers which look like fallen snow was in full flower along with Meadow Vetchling Lathyrus pratensis (3).
In one patch a small area of Heath Calluna vulgaris (4) has re-established itself and was home to a good number of Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (5) which were probably the pray for the large number of Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara (6)(7) which could also be found basking in the sun. Not Quite The South Of France…
Southborough Common, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
Southborough has a long history of occupation, with iron being worked in the area since prehistoric times although it was once much more densely forested than it is now although the common still holds large expanses of Wood Pasture which would have been introduced with the Norman Conquest and Acid Grassland which is locally known as the South of France.
As a common, local people who own houses may have commoners rights, this gives the people the ability to collect Estovers (firewood), Pannage (Right to turn out pigs for a period in autumn to eat mast), Marl (take sand or gravel), Turbary (take sods of earth for fuel), Piscary (right to fish) and Pasture (graze animals) although very few people still excise these rights nowadays. 
The acid grassland is currently under threat from Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (1) which is shading out some of the more specialist plants, although one species which rely on bracken could also be found, the Brown Silver-Line Moth Petrophora chlorosata (2) caterpillars feed on the leaves. Although in clear areas Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (8) a low growing plant, with tiny white flowers which look like fallen snow was in full flower along with Meadow Vetchling Lathyrus pratensis (3).
In one patch a small area of Heath Calluna vulgaris (4) has re-established itself and was home to a good number of Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (5) which were probably the pray for the large number of Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara (6)(7) which could also be found basking in the sun.

Not Quite The South Of France…

Southborough Common, Southborough, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England

Southborough has a long history of occupation, with iron being worked in the area since prehistoric times although it was once much more densely forested than it is now although the common still holds large expanses of Wood Pasture which would have been introduced with the Norman Conquest and Acid Grassland which is locally known as the South of France.

As a common, local people who own houses may have commoners rights, this gives the people the ability to collect Estovers (firewood), Pannage (Right to turn out pigs for a period in autumn to eat mast), Marl (take sand or gravel), Turbary (take sods of earth for fuel), Piscary (right to fish) and Pasture (graze animals) although very few people still excise these rights nowadays. 

The acid grassland is currently under threat from Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (1) which is shading out some of the more specialist plants, although one species which rely on bracken could also be found, the Brown Silver-Line Moth Petrophora chlorosata (2) caterpillars feed on the leaves. Although in clear areas Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (8) a low growing plant, with tiny white flowers which look like fallen snow was in full flower along with Meadow Vetchling Lathyrus pratensis (3).

In one patch a small area of Heath Calluna vulgaris (4) has re-established itself and was home to a good number of Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (5) which were probably the pray for the large number of Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara (6)(7) which could also be found basking in the sun.

Of Mice And Men
Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England
Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.
With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).
Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 
The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.
*Under license from Natural England Of Mice And Men
Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England
Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.
With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).
Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 
The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.
*Under license from Natural England Of Mice And Men
Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England
Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.
With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).
Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 
The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.
*Under license from Natural England Of Mice And Men
Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England
Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.
With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).
Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 
The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.
*Under license from Natural England Of Mice And Men
Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England
Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.
With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).
Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 
The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.
*Under license from Natural England Of Mice And Men
Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England
Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.
With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).
Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 
The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.
*Under license from Natural England Of Mice And Men
Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England
Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.
With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).
Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 
The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.
*Under license from Natural England Of Mice And Men
Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England
Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.
With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).
Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 
The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.
*Under license from Natural England Of Mice And Men
Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England
Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.
With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).
Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 
The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.
*Under license from Natural England

Of Mice And Men

Cinderhill Wood, Matfield, Kent, England

Cinderhill is primarily a Heathland reserve although large areas of it are covered in woodland, much of this was once hazel coppice and is slowly and surely being re-managed to benefit the wildlife which can be found there.

With the weather being as warm as it was no surprise to find several species of butterfly on the wing, the ragged winged Small Tortoiseshell Aglais urticae (1) was busy sunning itself on some Bramble Rubus fruticosa (1) as was an Essex Skipper Thymelicus lineola (3).

Many of the woodland plants were out in full flower, Wood Spurge Euphorbia amygdaloides (9) and Common Figwort Scrophularia nodosa (2) with their strange blooms could be found in the more open parts of the wood, Whilst Honeysuckle Lonicera periclymenum (6) filled the woods with a wonderful scent. A few baby Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (5) were busy flitting around and calling for food from their parents. 

The main reason for my visit was to check the boxes for Hazel Dormice Muscardinus avellanarius* (8). These adorable but rare mammals spend their lives in the trees, a few boxes also held the much larger and feistier Yellow-Necked Mouse Apodemus flavicollis (7) which was a nice surprise.

*Under license from Natural England

A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers. A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers. A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers. A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers. A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers. A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers. A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers. A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers. A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers. A Spotted Summer
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 
In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.
The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers.

A Spotted Summer

Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England

I’m lucky enough to work mere minutes away from The National Pinetum in Bedgebury which means at lunchtimes I can go for a short wander through the pines. 

In early summer the meadows surrounding the trees come alive with wildflowers, many of them such as Common Hawkweed Hieracium vulgatum (8), Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (6),Lady’s Smock Cardamine pratensis (7) and Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (5) can be found in a number of places.

The real speciality came in the form of hundreds of Common Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(3)(4)(10) which can be found throughout the UK, It can be very variable in how they look with some flowers lacking any marking and being almost completely white whilst others are delicately marked in pink. A few Common Twayblades Neottia ovata (9) were still in flower, one of which seems to have been visited by a Black-striped Longhorn Beetle Stenurella melanura (7), you can tell this due to the sticky green pollen which is stuck on the head of the beetle. A few Swollen-thighed Beetles Oedemera nobilis (5) could also be found feeding on a wide range of other flowers.

travelling again

So far I haven’t updated my blog half as much as I should have but once again, I’m travelling again! This time to Corfu, hopefully it’ll go better than last time…αντίο

Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view. Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view. Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view. Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view. Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view. Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view. Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view. Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view. Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view. Woodland Sanctuary
Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England
Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.
Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 
The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 
Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view.

Woodland Sanctuary

Collingwood, Hawkhurst, Kent, England

Collingwood is a small woodland nature reserve centered around a lake, it is manged by the Kent Wildlife Trust and once was part of the larger Collingwood Estate which was owned by the eminent astronomer John Herschel.

Much of the site are a wonderful mixture of native broad leaf woodland with the occasional exotic tree. Beech Fagus sylvatica (3)(4)trees were already dropping their mast, whilst their leaves shade out the sun creating a shadowy underworld. The under story was largely made up of Holly Ilex aquifolium (6) and Yew Taxus baccata (5), Yew is one of my favorite trees and has been used for century in wood turning and bow making, it is also Britain’s longest living tree with some specimens being well over 2000 years old. 

The woodland floor was also home to a wide range of flowering plants, Rosebay Willowherb Epilobium angustifolium (2) is a native plant but only to the extreme north of Scotland, all the plants found in the south of the UK came from American plants which escaped from gardens. It is common on disturbed ground, often being found on old fire sites and derelict buildings. 

Wood Avens Geum urbanum (8) and Common Mouse-Ear Cerastium fontanum (9) along with Hedge Woundwort Stachys sylvatica (7) which could be found growing in the vegetation surrounding the pond, the delicate flowers of Dog Rose Rosa canina (1) could be found climbing the scrubby trees providing a wonderful view.