Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9). Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9). Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9). Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9). Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9). Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9). Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9). Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9). Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9). Redstart Meadow
Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.
The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.
On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9).

Redstart Meadow

Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales

After wandering in the scrubby Sessile Oak Quercus petraea woodland around the north of the site I met with a surprise, a male Redstart Phoenicurus phoenicurus (5)(6). These attractive little birds are a specialist species to the western oak woodlands and this male was busy protecting his territory by flying round a ring of oak trees, making it fairly easy to photograph.

The meadow was mainly a mix of Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (2), Eyebright Euphrasia officinalis (3), Red Clover Trifolium pratense (3) and Pignut Conopodium majus (7) which are now much rarer than they used to be and would have once been found in almost every hay meadow.

On the rockier outcrops of Silurian rock, the commonest plant was Bird’s Foot Ornithopus perpusillus (10), a tiny member of the pea family which only measured a few centimetres tall. The delicate purple of Heath Speedwell Veronica officinalis (8) could be found at the base of the rocks, this slightly longer vegetation provided a home for insects such as Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (9).

Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5). Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5). Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5). Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5). Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5). Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5). Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5). Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5). Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5). Goosey Goosey Gander
West Marsh, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’  which means ‘long Island’.
On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.
The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5).

Goosey Goosey Gander

West Marsh, Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales

Much of Ynys Hir is lowland bog which has formed around the woodland which sits on an island of rock in the middle which is where the area get its name from the Welsh ‘Ynys Hir’ which means ‘long Island’.

On one of the more nutrient rich areas of the bog, vast stands of Yellow Flag Iris Iris pseudacorus (2)(3) dominate the landscape. The rhizomes were once used as an emetic, to induce vomiting. These stands provide the perfect habitat for dragonflys and damselflys, the two commonest species were the Large Red Damselflies Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7)
and Azure Damselflies Coenagrion puella (6), both of which can be found throughout the UK.

The dense stands of irises also provide the perfect breeding ground for one of Britain’s commonest non-natives, the Canada Goose Branta canadensis (9) which can be found in huge numbers at Ynys Hir. Bramble Rubus fruticosa (8) could also be found in many of the areas, often growing over dead trees. This provide food for a wide range of insects including the European Honey Bee Apis mellifera (5).

Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by. Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by. Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by. Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by. Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by. Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by. Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by. Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by. Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by. Frogs and Feathers
Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.
A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.
Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature.  
Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by.

Frogs and Feathers

Coed Penrhyn-Mawr, Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales

Ynys Hir is always a lovely place to spend the day and in spring it is no different, many of the birds, such as this Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1), were busy collecting food for their growing young.

A few early Speckled Wood Pararge aegeria (2) butterflies were on the wing, many of which were feeding on the abundant woodland flowers. The tall elegant spikes of purple belonged to Foxgloves Digitalis purpurea (5)(6). Although beautiful, it is deadly poisonous but has been used to treat heart problems for hundreds of years.

Along one of the damper tracks through the woods, Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (4) was growing amongst Bracken Pteridium aqulinum (7) whilst the dead flower heads of bluebells were covered in Climbing Corydalis Ceratocapnos claviculata (9), this plant is commonly found in western woodlands and grows well under bracken due to its early flowering nature. 

Any damp habitat is a brilliant breeding ground for midges Chironomidae spp. (10) which in turn provides food for a large range of wildlife, including the Common Frog Rana temporaria (8) which can be found in almost any habitat, as long as a suitable breeding site, such as a rut or a pond is near by.

Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems. Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems. Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems. Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems. Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems. Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems. Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems. Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems. Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems. Silurian Scree Slopes
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.
A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.
In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems.

Silurian Scree Slopes

North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

The scree slopes which have formed on the cliffs of north beach are remarkable unstable, although surprisingly a few plants have managed to cling on and survive in this ever changing habitat.

A large majority of the plants were Red Valerian Centranthus ruber (2) which is a native to southern Europe but is often grown in gardens. Feeding on these were a large number of White-Lipped Snails Cepaea hortensis (3). Thrift Armeria maritima (1) was yet another common plant and could be found growing on both the scree and some of the exposed rocks.

In grassy patches which were slightly more stable, Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (10), Ribwort PlantainPlantago lanceolata (5) and Horseshoe Vetch Hippocrepis comosa (6) all grew in abundance whilst the more unstable areas had Common Sorrel Rumex acetosa (7) and Coltsfoot Tussilago farfara (8). Coltsfoot was once collected and used a British substitute to tobacco, after drying it can used or be mixed with a small amount of honey and water to help cure it. It hasn’t got an bad flavour when smoked and was once used to cure lung problems.

Sunset Skies
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Just one of the perks of living on Aberystwyth Seafront…. Sunset Skies
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Just one of the perks of living on Aberystwyth Seafront…. Sunset Skies
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Just one of the perks of living on Aberystwyth Seafront….

Sunset Skies

North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

Just one of the perks of living on Aberystwyth Seafront….

Urban Exploration
Aberystwyth Golf Club, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
There’s always been something about abandoned buildings that draws me to them, with nature slowly taking back something which was once in human hands, it proves that nature has dominion over us.
It’s likely that this building was once central to Aberystwyth’s farming community but as it declined in the surrounding area, the land was deemed useless and turned into a golf course, leaving the decrepit broken building in the center of the links. Urban Exploration
Aberystwyth Golf Club, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
There’s always been something about abandoned buildings that draws me to them, with nature slowly taking back something which was once in human hands, it proves that nature has dominion over us.
It’s likely that this building was once central to Aberystwyth’s farming community but as it declined in the surrounding area, the land was deemed useless and turned into a golf course, leaving the decrepit broken building in the center of the links. Urban Exploration
Aberystwyth Golf Club, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
There’s always been something about abandoned buildings that draws me to them, with nature slowly taking back something which was once in human hands, it proves that nature has dominion over us.
It’s likely that this building was once central to Aberystwyth’s farming community but as it declined in the surrounding area, the land was deemed useless and turned into a golf course, leaving the decrepit broken building in the center of the links. Urban Exploration
Aberystwyth Golf Club, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
There’s always been something about abandoned buildings that draws me to them, with nature slowly taking back something which was once in human hands, it proves that nature has dominion over us.
It’s likely that this building was once central to Aberystwyth’s farming community but as it declined in the surrounding area, the land was deemed useless and turned into a golf course, leaving the decrepit broken building in the center of the links. Urban Exploration
Aberystwyth Golf Club, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
There’s always been something about abandoned buildings that draws me to them, with nature slowly taking back something which was once in human hands, it proves that nature has dominion over us.
It’s likely that this building was once central to Aberystwyth’s farming community but as it declined in the surrounding area, the land was deemed useless and turned into a golf course, leaving the decrepit broken building in the center of the links. Urban Exploration
Aberystwyth Golf Club, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
There’s always been something about abandoned buildings that draws me to them, with nature slowly taking back something which was once in human hands, it proves that nature has dominion over us.
It’s likely that this building was once central to Aberystwyth’s farming community but as it declined in the surrounding area, the land was deemed useless and turned into a golf course, leaving the decrepit broken building in the center of the links. Urban Exploration
Aberystwyth Golf Club, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
There’s always been something about abandoned buildings that draws me to them, with nature slowly taking back something which was once in human hands, it proves that nature has dominion over us.
It’s likely that this building was once central to Aberystwyth’s farming community but as it declined in the surrounding area, the land was deemed useless and turned into a golf course, leaving the decrepit broken building in the center of the links.

Urban Exploration

Aberystwyth Golf Club, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

There’s always been something about abandoned buildings that draws me to them, with nature slowly taking back something which was once in human hands, it proves that nature has dominion over us.

It’s likely that this building was once central to Aberystwyth’s farming community but as it declined in the surrounding area, the land was deemed useless and turned into a golf course, leaving the decrepit broken building in the center of the links.

A Very Short Trip…

Sadly my trip didn’t go as planned, Before getting to Spa the racecar’s engine blew up, so it was decided we’d travel on towards Ypres and spend more time on the battlefields… This was obviously not meant to be, with our own cars engine blowing up just shy of Gent, Belgium… trying to get a broken car back from the continent is not as easy as you’d hope, and cost a fortune, after pushing the car for a mile through the ferry port, since they wouldn’t give us a tow, they did eventually and we caught the last ferry out of Calais, we then had to drive the very broken car into the center of Dover as they wouldn’t tow us to a place we could leave the car over night. It seems that lady luck isn’t on our side at the moment.

On the upside there should hopefully be some nice photos of Dover ferry port.

A Short Break…

Just a quick trip across the channel to visit the historic town of Ypres and the battlefields surrounding it, as well as some motorsport at Spa and short dip into Germany for the Nürburgring!

Tot Ziens!

Cliff Top Meadow
Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.
The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).
The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3). Cliff Top Meadow
Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.
The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).
The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3). Cliff Top Meadow
Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.
The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).
The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3). Cliff Top Meadow
Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.
The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).
The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3). Cliff Top Meadow
Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.
The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).
The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3). Cliff Top Meadow
Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.
The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).
The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3). Cliff Top Meadow
Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.
The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).
The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3). Cliff Top Meadow
Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.
The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).
The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3). Cliff Top Meadow
Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.
The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).
The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3).

Cliff Top Meadow

Ceredigion Coastal Path, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

Walking along the coastal path is something that I should definitely do more often, although only a short distance from Aberystwyth, you can feel like your a million miles away.

The meadow was well into flowering and had a fairly rich mixture of species, The higher nutrient areas such as those surrounding the old hut were full of Stinging Nettles Urtica dioica (9), which were home to one of Britain’s most invasive and unwanted invertebrates, the Harlequin Ladybird Harmonia axyridis (8).

The meadow itself largely consisted of Meadow Buttercups Ranunculus acris (6) and Ribwort Plantain Plantago lanceolata (2), this gave the meadow a wonderful yellow speckling. A few other species were present in the meadow, the fruiting heads of Dandelions Taraxacum officinale (5) could clearly be seen as could a  few Common Daisies Bellis perennis (3).

The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta. The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta. The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta. The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta. The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta. The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta. The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta. The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta. The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta. The Lost World
Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales
Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.
The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.
Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.
Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.
Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta.

The Lost World

Coed Cwm Cletwr, Tre-r-Ddol, Ceredigion, Wales

Coed Cwm Cletwr has to be one of my favorite woodlands to visit, as you walk down through the scrubby birch woods at the top of the slope, you eventually come to a humid lost world, rich in bryophytes and ferns.

The reason for my visit was to check the dormouse boxes present in the wood with The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales, although sadly I didn’t find any dormice, I did find plenty of wildlife.

Western Oak woodlands are well known for their specialist bird species and the Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca (2) is one of the species I set out to see. Not only did I see several males and females (photo), I also was lucky enough to see their sky blue eggs in a nest in one of the boxes.

Rain from the previous night had knocked a large amount of caterpillars from the canopy which could be found everywhere, every plant seemed to be covered in them. Most of the caterpillars were from the Geometridae (4)(5) family, the caterpillars are often call Inch-worms and loopers due to the way they move.

Plenty of flying insects were also on the wing, a Large Red Damselfly Pyrrhosoma nymphula (7) were flying close to the stream. Although common, the Green Bottle Fly Lucilia sericata (9) is still a striking looking species up close and there were plenty feeding on the wildflowers growing in the valley bottom. Pignut Conopodium majus (8) was a nice species to find as it broke up the almost never ending stretch of Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta.

Crustaceans Galore
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the sun beaming and the tide going out it was time to have a search on the foreshore for crabs. Due to the rocky nature of Aberystwyth’s coast, it’s a hot spot for these shelled invertebrates.
It didn’t take long rock flipping, for me to find one. The first find was a particularly aggressive Velvet Swimming Crab Necora puber (6), also know as ‘devil crabs’ due to their red eyes and feisty nature. The second find was a Edible Crab Cancer pagurus (2), although this specimen was much to small to eat, it is the most commonly landed species in the UK
The final species was a Common Shore Crab , these are the commonest species found in the UK and can be found almost anywhere round the coast. Sadly they are two small a species to get a good amount of crab meat from but make a lovely crab bisque. Crustaceans Galore
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the sun beaming and the tide going out it was time to have a search on the foreshore for crabs. Due to the rocky nature of Aberystwyth’s coast, it’s a hot spot for these shelled invertebrates.
It didn’t take long rock flipping, for me to find one. The first find was a particularly aggressive Velvet Swimming Crab Necora puber (6), also know as ‘devil crabs’ due to their red eyes and feisty nature. The second find was a Edible Crab Cancer pagurus (2), although this specimen was much to small to eat, it is the most commonly landed species in the UK
The final species was a Common Shore Crab , these are the commonest species found in the UK and can be found almost anywhere round the coast. Sadly they are two small a species to get a good amount of crab meat from but make a lovely crab bisque. Crustaceans Galore
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the sun beaming and the tide going out it was time to have a search on the foreshore for crabs. Due to the rocky nature of Aberystwyth’s coast, it’s a hot spot for these shelled invertebrates.
It didn’t take long rock flipping, for me to find one. The first find was a particularly aggressive Velvet Swimming Crab Necora puber (6), also know as ‘devil crabs’ due to their red eyes and feisty nature. The second find was a Edible Crab Cancer pagurus (2), although this specimen was much to small to eat, it is the most commonly landed species in the UK
The final species was a Common Shore Crab , these are the commonest species found in the UK and can be found almost anywhere round the coast. Sadly they are two small a species to get a good amount of crab meat from but make a lovely crab bisque. Crustaceans Galore
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the sun beaming and the tide going out it was time to have a search on the foreshore for crabs. Due to the rocky nature of Aberystwyth’s coast, it’s a hot spot for these shelled invertebrates.
It didn’t take long rock flipping, for me to find one. The first find was a particularly aggressive Velvet Swimming Crab Necora puber (6), also know as ‘devil crabs’ due to their red eyes and feisty nature. The second find was a Edible Crab Cancer pagurus (2), although this specimen was much to small to eat, it is the most commonly landed species in the UK
The final species was a Common Shore Crab , these are the commonest species found in the UK and can be found almost anywhere round the coast. Sadly they are two small a species to get a good amount of crab meat from but make a lovely crab bisque. Crustaceans Galore
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the sun beaming and the tide going out it was time to have a search on the foreshore for crabs. Due to the rocky nature of Aberystwyth’s coast, it’s a hot spot for these shelled invertebrates.
It didn’t take long rock flipping, for me to find one. The first find was a particularly aggressive Velvet Swimming Crab Necora puber (6), also know as ‘devil crabs’ due to their red eyes and feisty nature. The second find was a Edible Crab Cancer pagurus (2), although this specimen was much to small to eat, it is the most commonly landed species in the UK
The final species was a Common Shore Crab , these are the commonest species found in the UK and can be found almost anywhere round the coast. Sadly they are two small a species to get a good amount of crab meat from but make a lovely crab bisque. Crustaceans Galore
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the sun beaming and the tide going out it was time to have a search on the foreshore for crabs. Due to the rocky nature of Aberystwyth’s coast, it’s a hot spot for these shelled invertebrates.
It didn’t take long rock flipping, for me to find one. The first find was a particularly aggressive Velvet Swimming Crab Necora puber (6), also know as ‘devil crabs’ due to their red eyes and feisty nature. The second find was a Edible Crab Cancer pagurus (2), although this specimen was much to small to eat, it is the most commonly landed species in the UK
The final species was a Common Shore Crab , these are the commonest species found in the UK and can be found almost anywhere round the coast. Sadly they are two small a species to get a good amount of crab meat from but make a lovely crab bisque. Crustaceans Galore
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the sun beaming and the tide going out it was time to have a search on the foreshore for crabs. Due to the rocky nature of Aberystwyth’s coast, it’s a hot spot for these shelled invertebrates.
It didn’t take long rock flipping, for me to find one. The first find was a particularly aggressive Velvet Swimming Crab Necora puber (6), also know as ‘devil crabs’ due to their red eyes and feisty nature. The second find was a Edible Crab Cancer pagurus (2), although this specimen was much to small to eat, it is the most commonly landed species in the UK
The final species was a Common Shore Crab , these are the commonest species found in the UK and can be found almost anywhere round the coast. Sadly they are two small a species to get a good amount of crab meat from but make a lovely crab bisque.

Crustaceans Galore

North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

With the sun beaming and the tide going out it was time to have a search on the foreshore for crabs. Due to the rocky nature of Aberystwyth’s coast, it’s a hot spot for these shelled invertebrates.

It didn’t take long rock flipping, for me to find one. The first find was a particularly aggressive Velvet Swimming Crab Necora puber (6), also know as ‘devil crabs’ due to their red eyes and feisty nature. The second find was a Edible Crab Cancer pagurus (2), although this specimen was much to small to eat, it is the most commonly landed species in the UK

The final species was a Common Shore Crab , these are the commonest species found in the UK and can be found almost anywhere round the coast. Sadly they are two small a species to get a good amount of crab meat from but make a lovely crab bisque.

Abandon Ship
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
This was the surprising scene I woke up to one morning, somehow a small boat had caught alight offshore, mostly likely due to an engine problem. The local RNLI Aberystwyth lifeboat station sent out its small Arancia A-78 inshore lifeboat rescuing the skipper of the boat.
As the morning went on more and more of the boat caught alight slowly drifting south on the tide, luckily no one was injured and the boat eventually grounded close to south beach. Abandon Ship
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
This was the surprising scene I woke up to one morning, somehow a small boat had caught alight offshore, mostly likely due to an engine problem. The local RNLI Aberystwyth lifeboat station sent out its small Arancia A-78 inshore lifeboat rescuing the skipper of the boat.
As the morning went on more and more of the boat caught alight slowly drifting south on the tide, luckily no one was injured and the boat eventually grounded close to south beach. Abandon Ship
North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
This was the surprising scene I woke up to one morning, somehow a small boat had caught alight offshore, mostly likely due to an engine problem. The local RNLI Aberystwyth lifeboat station sent out its small Arancia A-78 inshore lifeboat rescuing the skipper of the boat.
As the morning went on more and more of the boat caught alight slowly drifting south on the tide, luckily no one was injured and the boat eventually grounded close to south beach.

Abandon Ship

North Beach, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

This was the surprising scene I woke up to one morning, somehow a small boat had caught alight offshore, mostly likely due to an engine problem. The local RNLI Aberystwyth lifeboat station sent out its small Arancia A-78 inshore lifeboat rescuing the skipper of the boat.

As the morning went on more and more of the boat caught alight slowly drifting south on the tide, luckily no one was injured and the boat eventually grounded close to south beach.

Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva. Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva. Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva. Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva. Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva. Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva. Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva. Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva. Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva. Dusk on the Dunes
Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales
The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.
Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand. 
In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.
Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva.

Dusk on the Dunes

Twyni Bâch, Ynyslas, Ceredigion, Wales

The dunes at dusk were much more fruitful than I was expecting it to be, with large amounts of flowers blooming in the dune slacks, and plenty of migrants breeding in the scrub, it was awash with life.

Meadow Pipits Anthus pratensis (1) and Stonechats Saxicola rubicola (7) were busy feeding this years generation of young, and could be seen gathering small insects to feed them. Further into the dunes a Common Lizard Zootoca vivipara (3) could be found soaking up the last of the suns rays, whilst a Lackey Moth Caterpillar Malacosoma neustria (4) struggled against the shifting sand.

In the more protected dune slacks a wide range of wildflowers could be found in bloom. Hound’s-tongue Cynoglossum officinale (5)  could be found in large numbers, these were once believed to ward off dog attacks if a leaf was worn in a shoe, the related tiny blue flowers of Early Forget-Me-Not Myosotis ramosissima (6) could also be found growing throughout the sand dunes.

Delicate tiny pink flowers could also be found on the dunes, these belonged to the Small-Flowered Crane’s-Bill Geranium pusillum (9) a member of the Geranium family. A soft purplecould also be found, Common Dog-Violets Viola riviniana (10) are common throughout much of the UK. Visiting a few flowers was a Cinnibar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (8), these gain their toxiccity from their food plant which they consume when they’re a larva.

Wing Stretches
Nant-y-Moch Reservoir, Ponterwyd, Ceredigion, Wales 
In one of the valleys close to the reservoir a small patch of woodland still remains. It is likely that much of the upland valleys which are now so barren and bare would have once looked like this, rich in wildflowers and dappled in shade.
Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (2)(3), of course were the most common plant in the understory and in the evening sun they looked even more purple than they normally would, inter-spaced between them were ferns and the delicate flowers of Herb-Robert Geranium robertianum (4).
Singing high in the trees was a very drab looking Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus (5)(6) which was busy preening and stretching, in between singing its short lyrical song.

Wing Stretches
Nant-y-Moch Reservoir, Ponterwyd, Ceredigion, Wales 
In one of the valleys close to the reservoir a small patch of woodland still remains. It is likely that much of the upland valleys which are now so barren and bare would have once looked like this, rich in wildflowers and dappled in shade.
Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (2)(3), of course were the most common plant in the understory and in the evening sun they looked even more purple than they normally would, inter-spaced between them were ferns and the delicate flowers of Herb-Robert Geranium robertianum (4).
Singing high in the trees was a very drab looking Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus (5)(6) which was busy preening and stretching, in between singing its short lyrical song.

Wing Stretches
Nant-y-Moch Reservoir, Ponterwyd, Ceredigion, Wales 
In one of the valleys close to the reservoir a small patch of woodland still remains. It is likely that much of the upland valleys which are now so barren and bare would have once looked like this, rich in wildflowers and dappled in shade.
Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (2)(3), of course were the most common plant in the understory and in the evening sun they looked even more purple than they normally would, inter-spaced between them were ferns and the delicate flowers of Herb-Robert Geranium robertianum (4).
Singing high in the trees was a very drab looking Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus (5)(6) which was busy preening and stretching, in between singing its short lyrical song.

Wing Stretches
Nant-y-Moch Reservoir, Ponterwyd, Ceredigion, Wales 
In one of the valleys close to the reservoir a small patch of woodland still remains. It is likely that much of the upland valleys which are now so barren and bare would have once looked like this, rich in wildflowers and dappled in shade.
Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (2)(3), of course were the most common plant in the understory and in the evening sun they looked even more purple than they normally would, inter-spaced between them were ferns and the delicate flowers of Herb-Robert Geranium robertianum (4).
Singing high in the trees was a very drab looking Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus (5)(6) which was busy preening and stretching, in between singing its short lyrical song.

Wing Stretches
Nant-y-Moch Reservoir, Ponterwyd, Ceredigion, Wales 
In one of the valleys close to the reservoir a small patch of woodland still remains. It is likely that much of the upland valleys which are now so barren and bare would have once looked like this, rich in wildflowers and dappled in shade.
Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (2)(3), of course were the most common plant in the understory and in the evening sun they looked even more purple than they normally would, inter-spaced between them were ferns and the delicate flowers of Herb-Robert Geranium robertianum (4).
Singing high in the trees was a very drab looking Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus (5)(6) which was busy preening and stretching, in between singing its short lyrical song.

Wing Stretches
Nant-y-Moch Reservoir, Ponterwyd, Ceredigion, Wales 
In one of the valleys close to the reservoir a small patch of woodland still remains. It is likely that much of the upland valleys which are now so barren and bare would have once looked like this, rich in wildflowers and dappled in shade.
Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (2)(3), of course were the most common plant in the understory and in the evening sun they looked even more purple than they normally would, inter-spaced between them were ferns and the delicate flowers of Herb-Robert Geranium robertianum (4).
Singing high in the trees was a very drab looking Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus (5)(6) which was busy preening and stretching, in between singing its short lyrical song.

Wing Stretches
Nant-y-Moch Reservoir, Ponterwyd, Ceredigion, Wales 
In one of the valleys close to the reservoir a small patch of woodland still remains. It is likely that much of the upland valleys which are now so barren and bare would have once looked like this, rich in wildflowers and dappled in shade.
Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (2)(3), of course were the most common plant in the understory and in the evening sun they looked even more purple than they normally would, inter-spaced between them were ferns and the delicate flowers of Herb-Robert Geranium robertianum (4).
Singing high in the trees was a very drab looking Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus (5)(6) which was busy preening and stretching, in between singing its short lyrical song.

Wing Stretches

Nant-y-Moch Reservoir, Ponterwyd, Ceredigion, Wales

In one of the valleys close to the reservoir a small patch of woodland still remains. It is likely that much of the upland valleys which are now so barren and bare would have once looked like this, rich in wildflowers and dappled in shade.

Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (2)(3), of course were the most common plant in the understory and in the evening sun they looked even more purple than they normally would, inter-spaced between them were ferns and the delicate flowers of Herb-Robert Geranium robertianum (4).

Singing high in the trees was a very drab looking Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus (5)(6) which was busy preening and stretching, in between singing its short lyrical song.

Time to get the seeds into the cold ground.
It takes a while to grow anything,
Before it’s coming to the end