Travelling

I’ll be away for a few days traveling to Amsterdam, Holland and then onto Skomer in Pembrokeshire, Wales. Once back I should hopefully have a lot of photos to post!

Distant Ducks
One of the large pools out on the rough grazing pasture is home to a few species of duck and goose.
Teal Anas crecca (2) are particular attractive small dabbling ducks, whilst the much larger showier Shelduck Tadorna tadorna (3) will use the pool when not out on the estuary or salt marsh feeding. As always the ever common Canada Geese Branta canadensis (4) were at the pool, this time joined by a Farmyard Goose Anser anser domesticus (4) which must have escaped from somewhere local. A very unseasonal young Whooper Swan Cygnus cygnus (4) could be seen, normally by now these birds would be on migration to their breeding grounds in Siberia. Distant Ducks
One of the large pools out on the rough grazing pasture is home to a few species of duck and goose.
Teal Anas crecca (2) are particular attractive small dabbling ducks, whilst the much larger showier Shelduck Tadorna tadorna (3) will use the pool when not out on the estuary or salt marsh feeding. As always the ever common Canada Geese Branta canadensis (4) were at the pool, this time joined by a Farmyard Goose Anser anser domesticus (4) which must have escaped from somewhere local. A very unseasonal young Whooper Swan Cygnus cygnus (4) could be seen, normally by now these birds would be on migration to their breeding grounds in Siberia. Distant Ducks
One of the large pools out on the rough grazing pasture is home to a few species of duck and goose.
Teal Anas crecca (2) are particular attractive small dabbling ducks, whilst the much larger showier Shelduck Tadorna tadorna (3) will use the pool when not out on the estuary or salt marsh feeding. As always the ever common Canada Geese Branta canadensis (4) were at the pool, this time joined by a Farmyard Goose Anser anser domesticus (4) which must have escaped from somewhere local. A very unseasonal young Whooper Swan Cygnus cygnus (4) could be seen, normally by now these birds would be on migration to their breeding grounds in Siberia. Distant Ducks
One of the large pools out on the rough grazing pasture is home to a few species of duck and goose.
Teal Anas crecca (2) are particular attractive small dabbling ducks, whilst the much larger showier Shelduck Tadorna tadorna (3) will use the pool when not out on the estuary or salt marsh feeding. As always the ever common Canada Geese Branta canadensis (4) were at the pool, this time joined by a Farmyard Goose Anser anser domesticus (4) which must have escaped from somewhere local. A very unseasonal young Whooper Swan Cygnus cygnus (4) could be seen, normally by now these birds would be on migration to their breeding grounds in Siberia.

Distant Ducks

One of the large pools out on the rough grazing pasture is home to a few species of duck and goose.

Teal Anas crecca (2) are particular attractive small dabbling ducks, whilst the much larger showier Shelduck Tadorna tadorna (3) will use the pool when not out on the estuary or salt marsh feeding. As always the ever common Canada Geese Branta canadensis (4) were at the pool, this time joined by a Farmyard Goose Anser anser domesticus (4) which must have escaped from somewhere local. A very unseasonal young Whooper Swan Cygnus cygnus (4) could be seen, normally by now these birds would be on migration to their breeding grounds in Siberia.

Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.
Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.
Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.
Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.
Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.
Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.
Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.
Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.
Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.
Ynys Edwin
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.
The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.
Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.

Ynys Edwin

Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales

Ynys Edwin is a raised peat bog which forms one of the many habitats found at Ynys Hir.

The bog is home to a wide range of specialist plant which can tolerate low nutrient environment, to help manage the site a group of Welsh Ponies (6) are put out onto the bog during winter to reduce competition caused by grass. In the more eutrophic, nutrient rich areas the bog changes to reed swamp and carr woodland , it here you find the most wildlife.

Dunnocks Prunella modularis (10) can be heard singing from many of the young willows, Canada Geese Branta canadensis (8) make use of the thicker vegetation to nest in and Small Tortoiseshells Aglais urticae (3) flit from tussock to tussock patrolling their territory. On the standing deadwood, Birch Polypore Piptoporus betulinus (4) grow in perfusion these were once used as a strop to sharpen blades down to the finest edge, they were also used as plasters due to their anti-inflammatory properties. It still surprises me what uses plants and fungus’s had and how even today they could still be used.

Serpents Of The Wet Woodland
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir also also home to a patch of damp wet woodland containing mainly Willow Sallix spp, Birch Betula spp and a few Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris.The non native Snowy Mespilus Amelanchier lamarckii (7) was providing a nice show of white in the flooded woodland, some of the shallower pools  were being used by Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (1) to clean their feathers.
The woodlands were not just home to bird but cold-blooded reptiles, Grass Snakes Natrix natrix (5)(4) will regularly use wet woodlands to find their preferred prey, amphibians. It was nice to find the first one of the year in such a beautiful location and I hope its the first of many this year.
  Serpents Of The Wet Woodland
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir also also home to a patch of damp wet woodland containing mainly Willow Sallix spp, Birch Betula spp and a few Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris.The non native Snowy Mespilus Amelanchier lamarckii (7) was providing a nice show of white in the flooded woodland, some of the shallower pools  were being used by Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (1) to clean their feathers.
The woodlands were not just home to bird but cold-blooded reptiles, Grass Snakes Natrix natrix (5)(4) will regularly use wet woodlands to find their preferred prey, amphibians. It was nice to find the first one of the year in such a beautiful location and I hope its the first of many this year.
  Serpents Of The Wet Woodland
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir also also home to a patch of damp wet woodland containing mainly Willow Sallix spp, Birch Betula spp and a few Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris.The non native Snowy Mespilus Amelanchier lamarckii (7) was providing a nice show of white in the flooded woodland, some of the shallower pools  were being used by Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (1) to clean their feathers.
The woodlands were not just home to bird but cold-blooded reptiles, Grass Snakes Natrix natrix (5)(4) will regularly use wet woodlands to find their preferred prey, amphibians. It was nice to find the first one of the year in such a beautiful location and I hope its the first of many this year.
  Serpents Of The Wet Woodland
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir also also home to a patch of damp wet woodland containing mainly Willow Sallix spp, Birch Betula spp and a few Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris.The non native Snowy Mespilus Amelanchier lamarckii (7) was providing a nice show of white in the flooded woodland, some of the shallower pools  were being used by Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (1) to clean their feathers.
The woodlands were not just home to bird but cold-blooded reptiles, Grass Snakes Natrix natrix (5)(4) will regularly use wet woodlands to find their preferred prey, amphibians. It was nice to find the first one of the year in such a beautiful location and I hope its the first of many this year.
  Serpents Of The Wet Woodland
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir also also home to a patch of damp wet woodland containing mainly Willow Sallix spp, Birch Betula spp and a few Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris.The non native Snowy Mespilus Amelanchier lamarckii (7) was providing a nice show of white in the flooded woodland, some of the shallower pools  were being used by Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (1) to clean their feathers.
The woodlands were not just home to bird but cold-blooded reptiles, Grass Snakes Natrix natrix (5)(4) will regularly use wet woodlands to find their preferred prey, amphibians. It was nice to find the first one of the year in such a beautiful location and I hope its the first of many this year.
  Serpents Of The Wet Woodland
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir also also home to a patch of damp wet woodland containing mainly Willow Sallix spp, Birch Betula spp and a few Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris.The non native Snowy Mespilus Amelanchier lamarckii (7) was providing a nice show of white in the flooded woodland, some of the shallower pools  were being used by Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (1) to clean their feathers.
The woodlands were not just home to bird but cold-blooded reptiles, Grass Snakes Natrix natrix (5)(4) will regularly use wet woodlands to find their preferred prey, amphibians. It was nice to find the first one of the year in such a beautiful location and I hope its the first of many this year.
  Serpents Of The Wet Woodland
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir also also home to a patch of damp wet woodland containing mainly Willow Sallix spp, Birch Betula spp and a few Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris.The non native Snowy Mespilus Amelanchier lamarckii (7) was providing a nice show of white in the flooded woodland, some of the shallower pools  were being used by Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (1) to clean their feathers.
The woodlands were not just home to bird but cold-blooded reptiles, Grass Snakes Natrix natrix (5)(4) will regularly use wet woodlands to find their preferred prey, amphibians. It was nice to find the first one of the year in such a beautiful location and I hope its the first of many this year.
  Serpents Of The Wet Woodland
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
Ynys Hir also also home to a patch of damp wet woodland containing mainly Willow Sallix spp, Birch Betula spp and a few Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris.The non native Snowy Mespilus Amelanchier lamarckii (7) was providing a nice show of white in the flooded woodland, some of the shallower pools  were being used by Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (1) to clean their feathers.
The woodlands were not just home to bird but cold-blooded reptiles, Grass Snakes Natrix natrix (5)(4) will regularly use wet woodlands to find their preferred prey, amphibians. It was nice to find the first one of the year in such a beautiful location and I hope its the first of many this year.
 

Serpents Of The Wet Woodland

Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales

Ynys Hir also also home to a patch of damp wet woodland containing mainly Willow Sallix spp, Birch Betula spp and a few Scots Pine Pinus sylvestris.The non native Snowy Mespilus Amelanchier lamarckii (7) was providing a nice show of white in the flooded woodland, some of the shallower pools  were being used by Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (1) to clean their feathers.

The woodlands were not just home to bird but cold-blooded reptiles, Grass Snakes Natrix natrix (5)(4) will regularly use wet woodlands to find their preferred prey, amphibians. It was nice to find the first one of the year in such a beautiful location and I hope its the first of many this year.

 

Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble. Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble. Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble. Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble. Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble. Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble. Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble. Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble. Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble. Skulking Birds
Ynys Hir,  Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales
A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.
With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.
Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks  Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble.

Skulking Birds

Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales

A large proportion of Ynys Hir is traditional Welsh Oak Woodland which contain a wide range of species of woodland plants and birds.

With spring well on the way the woodland flowers are perfuming the wood with their sweet scent, Wood Anemone Anemone nemorosa (9) carpet the woodland white whilst the lime green clover like foliage of Wood Sorrel
Oxalis acetosella (7) grows almost everywhere, even on top of fallen logs and stone walls. It’s also an edible plant which has a taste not unlike apple peel and is quite refreshing to nibble on country walks. Another common edible plant is Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (6), both its leaves and flowers can be eaten raw or quickly boiled.

Ynys Hir is of course famous for its birds and the woodlands are home to a wide range of species. Dunnocks Prunella modularis (1) and Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla (5) were skulking round patches of brambles or piles of brush wood, with the blackcap occasionally giving its ‘Tak' alarm call when disturbed. As always Robins Erithacus rubecula (3) were providing their whispy melodic song from a low branch in a tree in contrast to the male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) gives a strong fluted warble.

Dyfi Estuary

Ynys Hir, Dyfi Furnace, Ceredigion, Wales

The Dyfi Estuary is an extensive area of tidal mudflats, salt marsh, creaks and sand dunes. These provide wintering grounds for a large numbers of waders and geese.

The RSPB own a large swath of the northern shore which including the Ynys Hir nature reserve.

Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch. Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch. Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch. Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch. Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch. Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch. Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch. Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch. Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch. Warts And All
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.
As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch.

Warts And All

Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

More rock flipping at Penglais quarry produced a very welcome surprise, A female Common Toad Bufo bufo (1)(2)(3). It was fairly surprising finding a toad so far away from water, unlike frogs, toads prefer to spawn in lakes and large ponds, non of which can be found close by but toads will range a huge distance from their breeding ponds.

As always flipping a few rocks produced a nice array of Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (4-10) this even included a baby which was tiny. Slow worms give birth to live young which are black with a rich gold dorsal stripe making them quite attractive. I also found two Common Lizards Zootoca vivipara which were much to quick for me to catch.

Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb. Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb. Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb. Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb. Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb. Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb. Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb. Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb. Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb. Plants And Insects Of The Quarry
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.
A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry. 
Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb.

Plants And Insects Of The Quarry

Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

When the sun comes out the quarry is a hive of insect activity, large numbers of hover flies and Buff-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus terrestris (2) were busy collecting nectar from the Gorse Ulex europea (10) flowers, some become very drunk and could be found sleeping it off beneath the bush. A single Peacock Butterfly Inachis io (8) was busy feeding on Blackthorn flowers Prunus spinosa. Feeding on the flowers was a Angle Shades Moth Caterpillar Phlogophora meticulosa (6) whilst close by a Dock Bug Coreus marginatus (7) was resting on a leaf.

A few interesting plants could be found, a few Bluebells Hyacinthoides non-scripta (1) and patches of Greater Stitchwort Stellaria holostea (3) could still be found in the quarry.

Two foragable plants could be found, Crow Garlic Allium vineale (9) can be used instead of chives, whilst Wood Sage Teucrium scorodonia (5) can be used a herb.

Train Tracks Through The Marsh
Dovey Junction Station, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
You wouldn’t think of a train station normally when you think of looking for Ospreys Pandion haliaetus (4) but from Dovey Junction Station you can easily see the nest and perch used by the Dyfi Osprey Project. 
The path towards the station is lined by thick stands of Common Reed Phragmites australis (4) whilst on drier ground carr woodlands of Willow Sallix spp. and Birch Betula spp. break up the thick reedbed.
Sadly the weather was awful but on the up side we did see an osprey sitting on the nest! Train Tracks Through The Marsh
Dovey Junction Station, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
You wouldn’t think of a train station normally when you think of looking for Ospreys Pandion haliaetus (4) but from Dovey Junction Station you can easily see the nest and perch used by the Dyfi Osprey Project. 
The path towards the station is lined by thick stands of Common Reed Phragmites australis (4) whilst on drier ground carr woodlands of Willow Sallix spp. and Birch Betula spp. break up the thick reedbed.
Sadly the weather was awful but on the up side we did see an osprey sitting on the nest! Train Tracks Through The Marsh
Dovey Junction Station, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
You wouldn’t think of a train station normally when you think of looking for Ospreys Pandion haliaetus (4) but from Dovey Junction Station you can easily see the nest and perch used by the Dyfi Osprey Project. 
The path towards the station is lined by thick stands of Common Reed Phragmites australis (4) whilst on drier ground carr woodlands of Willow Sallix spp. and Birch Betula spp. break up the thick reedbed.
Sadly the weather was awful but on the up side we did see an osprey sitting on the nest! Train Tracks Through The Marsh
Dovey Junction Station, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
You wouldn’t think of a train station normally when you think of looking for Ospreys Pandion haliaetus (4) but from Dovey Junction Station you can easily see the nest and perch used by the Dyfi Osprey Project. 
The path towards the station is lined by thick stands of Common Reed Phragmites australis (4) whilst on drier ground carr woodlands of Willow Sallix spp. and Birch Betula spp. break up the thick reedbed.
Sadly the weather was awful but on the up side we did see an osprey sitting on the nest! Train Tracks Through The Marsh
Dovey Junction Station, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
You wouldn’t think of a train station normally when you think of looking for Ospreys Pandion haliaetus (4) but from Dovey Junction Station you can easily see the nest and perch used by the Dyfi Osprey Project. 
The path towards the station is lined by thick stands of Common Reed Phragmites australis (4) whilst on drier ground carr woodlands of Willow Sallix spp. and Birch Betula spp. break up the thick reedbed.
Sadly the weather was awful but on the up side we did see an osprey sitting on the nest! Train Tracks Through The Marsh
Dovey Junction Station, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
You wouldn’t think of a train station normally when you think of looking for Ospreys Pandion haliaetus (4) but from Dovey Junction Station you can easily see the nest and perch used by the Dyfi Osprey Project. 
The path towards the station is lined by thick stands of Common Reed Phragmites australis (4) whilst on drier ground carr woodlands of Willow Sallix spp. and Birch Betula spp. break up the thick reedbed.
Sadly the weather was awful but on the up side we did see an osprey sitting on the nest!

Train Tracks Through The Marsh

Dovey Junction Station, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales

You wouldn’t think of a train station normally when you think of looking for Ospreys Pandion haliaetus (4) but from Dovey Junction Station you can easily see the nest and perch used by the Dyfi Osprey Project.

The path towards the station is lined by thick stands of Common Reed Phragmites australis (4) whilst on drier ground carr woodlands of Willow Sallix spp. and Birch Betula spp. break up the thick reedbed.

Sadly the weather was awful but on the up side we did see an osprey sitting on the nest!

Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife. Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife. Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife. Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife. Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife. Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife. Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife. Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife. Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife. Reclaimed Land
Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales
Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.
Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.
Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.
The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest. 
Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife.

Reclaimed Land

Cors Dyfi, Derwenlas, Powys, Wales

Cors Dyfi was originally part of the estuary but in the past it was reclaimed for grazing, it was then planted up as a plantation of conifers before eventually becoming the rich and diverse wetland it is today.

Cors Dyfi is also home to the Dyfi Osprey Project run by the Montgomeryshire Wildlife Trust, Ospreys Pandion haliaetus have nested on the estuary since 2011 and are live streamed using a series of webcams located at the nesting sites and feeding roosts.

Although ospreys were seen it was from a great distance so I couldn’t get a clear image from here but that didn’t mean there wasn’t anything to see.

The reserve has a mixture of bog, wet woodland and scrub which cater for a wide range of wildlife, The Birch Betula spp. and Willow Salix spp. (1) provide feeding and nesting sites for Lesser Redpoll Pandion haliaetus (2)(3), these striking members of the finch family are often associated with northern birch forests. A few Robins Erithacus rubecula (6) were busy holding it’s territory whilst a single Blue Tit
Cyanistes caeruleus (9) was busy collecting moss for it’s nest.

Even though the weather was drab a large amount of White-Tailed Bumblebees Bombus lucorum (4) were collecting nectar from the flowering willow.  In the drier parts of the bog large stands of
Myrica gale (10) dominated the landscape, its odd to think that all of this can be found on what once was a conifer plantation devoid of wildlife.

Scales
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Another day and another part of the quarry with still more Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(3)(4)(6) being found. The weather is perfect for them at the moment with the hot sun quickly warming the stones up for them, unlike other lizards which will generally bask in the open, slow worms will bask under rocks and in tangled vegetation which makes them hard to spot unless you know what your looking for… Scales
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Another day and another part of the quarry with still more Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(3)(4)(6) being found. The weather is perfect for them at the moment with the hot sun quickly warming the stones up for them, unlike other lizards which will generally bask in the open, slow worms will bask under rocks and in tangled vegetation which makes them hard to spot unless you know what your looking for… Scales
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Another day and another part of the quarry with still more Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(3)(4)(6) being found. The weather is perfect for them at the moment with the hot sun quickly warming the stones up for them, unlike other lizards which will generally bask in the open, slow worms will bask under rocks and in tangled vegetation which makes them hard to spot unless you know what your looking for… Scales
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Another day and another part of the quarry with still more Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(3)(4)(6) being found. The weather is perfect for them at the moment with the hot sun quickly warming the stones up for them, unlike other lizards which will generally bask in the open, slow worms will bask under rocks and in tangled vegetation which makes them hard to spot unless you know what your looking for… Scales
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Another day and another part of the quarry with still more Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(3)(4)(6) being found. The weather is perfect for them at the moment with the hot sun quickly warming the stones up for them, unlike other lizards which will generally bask in the open, slow worms will bask under rocks and in tangled vegetation which makes them hard to spot unless you know what your looking for… Scales
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Another day and another part of the quarry with still more Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(3)(4)(6) being found. The weather is perfect for them at the moment with the hot sun quickly warming the stones up for them, unlike other lizards which will generally bask in the open, slow worms will bask under rocks and in tangled vegetation which makes them hard to spot unless you know what your looking for… Scales
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Another day and another part of the quarry with still more Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(3)(4)(6) being found. The weather is perfect for them at the moment with the hot sun quickly warming the stones up for them, unlike other lizards which will generally bask in the open, slow worms will bask under rocks and in tangled vegetation which makes them hard to spot unless you know what your looking for…

Scales

Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

Another day and another part of the quarry with still more Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(3)(4)(6) being found. The weather is perfect for them at the moment with the hot sun quickly warming the stones up for them, unlike other lizards which will generally bask in the open, slow worms will bask under rocks and in tangled vegetation which makes them hard to spot unless you know what your looking for…

Mazzard Flowers
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Mazzard is the old name for Wild Cherry Prunus avium (all photos) trees. In latin ‘Prunus avium’ means ‘bird cherry’ and it’s often the birds who get the small sweet berries.
Cherries have been eaten since the Bronze age with evidence being found all over Europe, including the UK and they have been actively cultivated since 800BC. Mazzard Flowers
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Mazzard is the old name for Wild Cherry Prunus avium (all photos) trees. In latin ‘Prunus avium’ means ‘bird cherry’ and it’s often the birds who get the small sweet berries.
Cherries have been eaten since the Bronze age with evidence being found all over Europe, including the UK and they have been actively cultivated since 800BC. Mazzard Flowers
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
Mazzard is the old name for Wild Cherry Prunus avium (all photos) trees. In latin ‘Prunus avium’ means ‘bird cherry’ and it’s often the birds who get the small sweet berries.
Cherries have been eaten since the Bronze age with evidence being found all over Europe, including the UK and they have been actively cultivated since 800BC.

Mazzard Flowers

Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

Mazzard is the old name for Wild Cherry Prunus avium (all photos) trees. In latin ‘Prunus avium’ means ‘bird cherry’ and it’s often the birds who get the small sweet berries.

Cherries have been eaten since the Bronze age with evidence being found all over Europe, including the UK and they have been actively cultivated since 800BC.

A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past. A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past. A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past. A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past. A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past. A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past. A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past. A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past. A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past. A Limbless Lizard
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 
Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past.

A Limbless Lizard

Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

A quick evening check under the rocks in the old quarry produced 5 Slow Worms Anguis fragilis (1)(4)(6)(8)(9). It’s not until you get them in the hand you notice the beautiful individual patterns which adorn their faces and bodies. 

Slow worms can shred their tails as a defense against predators and their was a mixture of full tailed adults and ones which had shed their tails as a defense at some point in the past.

Spring Songster
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the Blackthorn Prunis spinosa (all photos) out in a riot of small white flowers, which litter the ground like snowflakes I can think of no better time of year. 
Not only do the flowers attract bees but also feeding Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (all photos) which were drinking the abundant nectar and flitting out to quickly grab a tiny flying insect.
They really weren’t the easiest thing to photograph in the thick scrub but I managed a few shots I was happy with. Spring Songster
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the Blackthorn Prunis spinosa (all photos) out in a riot of small white flowers, which litter the ground like snowflakes I can think of no better time of year. 
Not only do the flowers attract bees but also feeding Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (all photos) which were drinking the abundant nectar and flitting out to quickly grab a tiny flying insect.
They really weren’t the easiest thing to photograph in the thick scrub but I managed a few shots I was happy with. Spring Songster
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the Blackthorn Prunis spinosa (all photos) out in a riot of small white flowers, which litter the ground like snowflakes I can think of no better time of year. 
Not only do the flowers attract bees but also feeding Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (all photos) which were drinking the abundant nectar and flitting out to quickly grab a tiny flying insect.
They really weren’t the easiest thing to photograph in the thick scrub but I managed a few shots I was happy with. Spring Songster
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the Blackthorn Prunis spinosa (all photos) out in a riot of small white flowers, which litter the ground like snowflakes I can think of no better time of year. 
Not only do the flowers attract bees but also feeding Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (all photos) which were drinking the abundant nectar and flitting out to quickly grab a tiny flying insect.
They really weren’t the easiest thing to photograph in the thick scrub but I managed a few shots I was happy with. Spring Songster
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the Blackthorn Prunis spinosa (all photos) out in a riot of small white flowers, which litter the ground like snowflakes I can think of no better time of year. 
Not only do the flowers attract bees but also feeding Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (all photos) which were drinking the abundant nectar and flitting out to quickly grab a tiny flying insect.
They really weren’t the easiest thing to photograph in the thick scrub but I managed a few shots I was happy with. Spring Songster
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
With the Blackthorn Prunis spinosa (all photos) out in a riot of small white flowers, which litter the ground like snowflakes I can think of no better time of year. 
Not only do the flowers attract bees but also feeding Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (all photos) which were drinking the abundant nectar and flitting out to quickly grab a tiny flying insect.
They really weren’t the easiest thing to photograph in the thick scrub but I managed a few shots I was happy with.

Spring Songster

Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

With the Blackthorn Prunis spinosa (all photos) out in a riot of small white flowers, which litter the ground like snowflakes I can think of no better time of year.

Not only do the flowers attract bees but also feeding Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (all photos) which were drinking the abundant nectar and flitting out to quickly grab a tiny flying insect.

They really weren’t the easiest thing to photograph in the thick scrub but I managed a few shots I was happy with.

Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are. Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are. Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are. Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are. Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are. Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are. Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are. Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are. Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are. Birds Of A Feather
Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales
It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.
Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days. 
Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.
High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song. 
With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are.

Birds Of A Feather

Penglais Woods, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion, Wales

It’s spring and the birds are singing their hearts out, paring up and building their nests. Its amazing how many birds can be found in such a small remnant of woodland.

Bird song fills the wood, strangely one of loudest songs comes from low down in the thickets of brambles these are Wrens Troglodytes troglodytes (1) and they are one of Britain’s smallest birds. The smallest British bird is a Goldcrest Regulus regulus (3) it’s old english name “woodcock pilot” due to  migrating birds preceded the arrival of Woodcocks by a few days.

Robins Erithacus rubecula (2) sweet lyrical song provided a backdrop for many of the other calls, whilst the Chiffchaffs Phylloscopus collybita (7) and Willow Warblers Phylloscopus trochilus (4) calling through the wood allowed me to distinguish easily between the two birds, there is very little difference between them when looking at the drab olive coloured bird, just the colour of their legs and their wing length but their songs couldn’t be any more different.

High up in the top of a large oak tree a Carrion Crow Corvus corone (10) had formed it’s messy nest made of sticks, much more sophisticated nest building was being done by a pair of Long-Tailed Tits Aegithalos caudatus (6) which build their nests of lichen all secured together by spiders webs. A light twinkly song meant that some Goldfinches Carduelis carduelis (9) were about, these were once commonly kept cage birds due to their wonderful song.

With the evening drawing in the last surprise was a male Blackbird Turdus merula (8) calling. It always amazes me how many species can be found in one tiny patch of woodland and how precious these tiny fragments are.