Tunneler 
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
Mole hills are the bane of Gardeners and green-keepers but realistically how many of these people actually see the animals which they dislike so much? 
The European Mole Talpa europaea (both photos) is wonderfully adapted for it life in the soil, it’s powerful front feet allow it to dig up to 20m of new tunnels each day.They can mainly be found along river valleys and in woodland where the soil is soft but not waterlogged.
A mole will eat almost half its own body weight in food a day ad survives mainly on a diet of earth worms but will take other soil invertebrates which they find these using their highly specialized sense of smell. 
Sadly for me this mole was no longer alive but it gave me a wonderful chance to check out its anatomy and get a good look at a creature people rarely see… Tunneler 
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
Mole hills are the bane of Gardeners and green-keepers but realistically how many of these people actually see the animals which they dislike so much? 
The European Mole Talpa europaea (both photos) is wonderfully adapted for it life in the soil, it’s powerful front feet allow it to dig up to 20m of new tunnels each day.They can mainly be found along river valleys and in woodland where the soil is soft but not waterlogged.
A mole will eat almost half its own body weight in food a day ad survives mainly on a diet of earth worms but will take other soil invertebrates which they find these using their highly specialized sense of smell. 
Sadly for me this mole was no longer alive but it gave me a wonderful chance to check out its anatomy and get a good look at a creature people rarely see…

Tunneler 

Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England

Mole hills are the bane of Gardeners and green-keepers but realistically how many of these people actually see the animals which they dislike so much? 

The European Mole Talpa europaea (both photos) is wonderfully adapted for it life in the soil, it’s powerful front feet allow it to dig up to 20m of new tunnels each day.They can mainly be found along river valleys and in woodland where the soil is soft but not waterlogged.

A mole will eat almost half its own body weight in food a day ad survives mainly on a diet of earth worms but will take other soil invertebrates which they find these using their highly specialized sense of smell. 

Sadly for me this mole was no longer alive but it gave me a wonderful chance to check out its anatomy and get a good look at a creature people rarely see…

Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye. Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye. Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye. Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye. Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye. Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye. Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye. Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye. Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye. Valley Bog
Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England
Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.
The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.
In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 
The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye.

Valley Bog

Hothfield Common, Hothfield, Kent, England

Hothfield Common is contains the last four valley bogs found in Kent, the rest of the site is largely covered in associated heathland and acid grassland. The site is managed as a LNR (Local Nature Reserve) by the Kent Wildlife Trust but was once used as rough grazing land by commoners although this was basically abandoned in the 1940’s and scrub began to encroach on 3 of the valley bogs as well as the heath.

The reason for my visit was to look at the flora associated with the bog and also see if I could find any orchids species. I wasn’t disappointed, much of the site was covered in large swathes of Heath Spotted-Orchids Dactylorhiza maculata (6)(7) which can only be found on acidic, heathy areas. Due to this Hothfield remains the stronghold for this species in Kent.

In the slightly damper areas, Cross-Leaved Heath Erica tetralix (1) was one of the more dominant plants, Bramble Rubus fruticosa also formed dense thickets which were busy with feeding Meadow Brown Butterflies Maniola jurtina (10). 

The Valley Bog had the most interesting flora, the acid bog communities have formed in the small valleys where springs emerge between the joining of sandy Folkestone Beds and the impervious Sandgate Beds. These bogs are a haven for plant species such as Round-Leaved Sundew Drosera rotundifolia (3), Bog Pimpernel Anagallis tenella (5), Marsh St. John’s-Wort Hypericum elodes and the beautiful golden yellow Bog Asphodel Narthecium ossifragum (4), which was once used as a country hair dye.

Doodlebug Damage 
St. Mary’s Church, Little Chart, Kent, England
August 16th 1944, Britain had stormed the beaches of Normandy but was still locked in war. Germany had recently unleashed a new weapon, the V-1 Flying Bomb, also known colloquially as the Doodlebug due to the distinctive noise it made. Up to a hundred a day were passing over Kent on their way towards London but the RAF had other ideas and attempted to shoot down or topple the bomb out of the air.
At 8pm on the 22nd of August the RAF successful shot down the bomb, sadly causing it to hit St Mary’s Church causing its destruction but luckily no one was injured. Due to the extensive damage, it was decided that the church shouldn’t be rebuilt, since then the church has served as a reminder of the amount of damage which can be done in times of war.
Since being left nature has slowly taken it back, large swathes of the masonry work are covered in Ivy Hedera helix (2)(6) while grass covers the aisles. Wall-Rue Asplenium ruta-muraria (4) was growing out of lime filled crevices where the mortar had fallen out, whilst Yarrow Achillea millefolium (1) and Smooth Sow-Thistle Sonchus oleraceus (5) were growing out of the tops of the walls where there was a little more nutrients. Doodlebug Damage 
St. Mary’s Church, Little Chart, Kent, England
August 16th 1944, Britain had stormed the beaches of Normandy but was still locked in war. Germany had recently unleashed a new weapon, the V-1 Flying Bomb, also known colloquially as the Doodlebug due to the distinctive noise it made. Up to a hundred a day were passing over Kent on their way towards London but the RAF had other ideas and attempted to shoot down or topple the bomb out of the air.
At 8pm on the 22nd of August the RAF successful shot down the bomb, sadly causing it to hit St Mary’s Church causing its destruction but luckily no one was injured. Due to the extensive damage, it was decided that the church shouldn’t be rebuilt, since then the church has served as a reminder of the amount of damage which can be done in times of war.
Since being left nature has slowly taken it back, large swathes of the masonry work are covered in Ivy Hedera helix (2)(6) while grass covers the aisles. Wall-Rue Asplenium ruta-muraria (4) was growing out of lime filled crevices where the mortar had fallen out, whilst Yarrow Achillea millefolium (1) and Smooth Sow-Thistle Sonchus oleraceus (5) were growing out of the tops of the walls where there was a little more nutrients. Doodlebug Damage 
St. Mary’s Church, Little Chart, Kent, England
August 16th 1944, Britain had stormed the beaches of Normandy but was still locked in war. Germany had recently unleashed a new weapon, the V-1 Flying Bomb, also known colloquially as the Doodlebug due to the distinctive noise it made. Up to a hundred a day were passing over Kent on their way towards London but the RAF had other ideas and attempted to shoot down or topple the bomb out of the air.
At 8pm on the 22nd of August the RAF successful shot down the bomb, sadly causing it to hit St Mary’s Church causing its destruction but luckily no one was injured. Due to the extensive damage, it was decided that the church shouldn’t be rebuilt, since then the church has served as a reminder of the amount of damage which can be done in times of war.
Since being left nature has slowly taken it back, large swathes of the masonry work are covered in Ivy Hedera helix (2)(6) while grass covers the aisles. Wall-Rue Asplenium ruta-muraria (4) was growing out of lime filled crevices where the mortar had fallen out, whilst Yarrow Achillea millefolium (1) and Smooth Sow-Thistle Sonchus oleraceus (5) were growing out of the tops of the walls where there was a little more nutrients. Doodlebug Damage 
St. Mary’s Church, Little Chart, Kent, England
August 16th 1944, Britain had stormed the beaches of Normandy but was still locked in war. Germany had recently unleashed a new weapon, the V-1 Flying Bomb, also known colloquially as the Doodlebug due to the distinctive noise it made. Up to a hundred a day were passing over Kent on their way towards London but the RAF had other ideas and attempted to shoot down or topple the bomb out of the air.
At 8pm on the 22nd of August the RAF successful shot down the bomb, sadly causing it to hit St Mary’s Church causing its destruction but luckily no one was injured. Due to the extensive damage, it was decided that the church shouldn’t be rebuilt, since then the church has served as a reminder of the amount of damage which can be done in times of war.
Since being left nature has slowly taken it back, large swathes of the masonry work are covered in Ivy Hedera helix (2)(6) while grass covers the aisles. Wall-Rue Asplenium ruta-muraria (4) was growing out of lime filled crevices where the mortar had fallen out, whilst Yarrow Achillea millefolium (1) and Smooth Sow-Thistle Sonchus oleraceus (5) were growing out of the tops of the walls where there was a little more nutrients. Doodlebug Damage 
St. Mary’s Church, Little Chart, Kent, England
August 16th 1944, Britain had stormed the beaches of Normandy but was still locked in war. Germany had recently unleashed a new weapon, the V-1 Flying Bomb, also known colloquially as the Doodlebug due to the distinctive noise it made. Up to a hundred a day were passing over Kent on their way towards London but the RAF had other ideas and attempted to shoot down or topple the bomb out of the air.
At 8pm on the 22nd of August the RAF successful shot down the bomb, sadly causing it to hit St Mary’s Church causing its destruction but luckily no one was injured. Due to the extensive damage, it was decided that the church shouldn’t be rebuilt, since then the church has served as a reminder of the amount of damage which can be done in times of war.
Since being left nature has slowly taken it back, large swathes of the masonry work are covered in Ivy Hedera helix (2)(6) while grass covers the aisles. Wall-Rue Asplenium ruta-muraria (4) was growing out of lime filled crevices where the mortar had fallen out, whilst Yarrow Achillea millefolium (1) and Smooth Sow-Thistle Sonchus oleraceus (5) were growing out of the tops of the walls where there was a little more nutrients. Doodlebug Damage 
St. Mary’s Church, Little Chart, Kent, England
August 16th 1944, Britain had stormed the beaches of Normandy but was still locked in war. Germany had recently unleashed a new weapon, the V-1 Flying Bomb, also known colloquially as the Doodlebug due to the distinctive noise it made. Up to a hundred a day were passing over Kent on their way towards London but the RAF had other ideas and attempted to shoot down or topple the bomb out of the air.
At 8pm on the 22nd of August the RAF successful shot down the bomb, sadly causing it to hit St Mary’s Church causing its destruction but luckily no one was injured. Due to the extensive damage, it was decided that the church shouldn’t be rebuilt, since then the church has served as a reminder of the amount of damage which can be done in times of war.
Since being left nature has slowly taken it back, large swathes of the masonry work are covered in Ivy Hedera helix (2)(6) while grass covers the aisles. Wall-Rue Asplenium ruta-muraria (4) was growing out of lime filled crevices where the mortar had fallen out, whilst Yarrow Achillea millefolium (1) and Smooth Sow-Thistle Sonchus oleraceus (5) were growing out of the tops of the walls where there was a little more nutrients.

Doodlebug Damage 

St. Mary’s Church, Little Chart, Kent, England

August 16th 1944, Britain had stormed the beaches of Normandy but was still locked in war. Germany had recently unleashed a new weapon, the V-1 Flying Bomb, also known colloquially as the Doodlebug due to the distinctive noise it made. Up to a hundred a day were passing over Kent on their way towards London but the RAF had other ideas and attempted to shoot down or topple the bomb out of the air.

At 8pm on the 22nd of August the RAF successful shot down the bomb, sadly causing it to hit St Mary’s Church causing its destruction but luckily no one was injured. Due to the extensive damage, it was decided that the church shouldn’t be rebuilt, since then the church has served as a reminder of the amount of damage which can be done in times of war.

Since being left nature has slowly taken it back, large swathes of the masonry work are covered in Ivy Hedera helix (2)(6) while grass covers the aisles. Wall-Rue Asplenium ruta-muraria (4) was growing out of lime filled crevices where the mortar had fallen out, whilst Yarrow Achillea millefolium (1) and Smooth Sow-Thistle Sonchus oleraceus (5) were growing out of the tops of the walls where there was a little more nutrients.

Haunted House
Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England
Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.
I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.
A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.
Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.
A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter. Haunted House
Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England
Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.
I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.
A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.
Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.
A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter. Haunted House
Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England
Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.
I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.
A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.
Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.
A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter. Haunted House
Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England
Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.
I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.
A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.
Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.
A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter. Haunted House
Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England
Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.
I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.
A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.
Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.
A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter. Haunted House
Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England
Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.
I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.
A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.
Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.
A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter. Haunted House
Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England
Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.
I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.
A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.
Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.
A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter. Haunted House
Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England
Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.
I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.
A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.
Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.
A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter. Haunted House
Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England
Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.
I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.
A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.
Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.
A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter.

Haunted House

Headcorn Hall, Headcorn, Kent, England

Headcorn Hall was once a care home for the elderly which closed its doors in 2003 and has since been left for nature and time to take hold.

I’ve visited Headcorn Hall a few times in the past, mainly to have explore with my friends late at night but this time I went back to look at the flora, which is slowly taking over the site and the fauna which lives on it.

A patch of Bramble rubus fruticosus (4) had a Small White Pieris rapae (2) feeding on its flowers. A Flesh Fly Sarcophaga carnaria (3) could also be found resting on the leaves. Many of the plants found in the area surrounding the house were a selection of common weed species and old garden specimens.

Common Teasel Dipsacus sylvestris (6) is a tall spiky weed, which is often grown in gardens to attract birds. The Ragwort Jacobaea vulgaris had a large number of Cinnabar Moth Caterpillars Tyria jacobaeae (7) feeding on its leaves.

A few Ornamental Iris Iris spp. (8) could be found growing in the old garden out the back, along with some Ornamental trees. Out on the road you could see where humans had been helping to change the ecology of some plant species. Many maritime species such as Lesser Sea-Spurry Spergularia marina (9) have found a new niche habitat due to salt being spread on the roads, to counter ice in winter.

Purple Bells
Cinderhill, Brenchley, Kent, England
Working on heath during the summer cab be hot and tiring work, full sun with little shade it makes the perfect habitat for a number of specialist species.
Sadly much of the heath is being smothered by Bracken Pteridium aquilinum, so every year a team of volunteers attempt to help reduce it vigorous hold and return it back to the heather.
Although it was to early for the Ling Calluna vulgaris to be in flower, Bell Heather Erica cinerea (4) was putting on a beautiful show, it’s Latin name cinerea, means ashen and describes it’s wood stems. The dazzle camouflaged caterpillars of the Beautiful Yellow Underwing Anarta myrtilli (5) could be found feeding busily on the plants leaves whilst the White-Legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes (2) could often be found resting on its stems. Growing up through the canopy of heather were the white snowflake flowers of Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (7) and the tall elegant heads of Common St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum (3), the flowers are edible and taste quite nice and were once used as a cure for depression. A single nymph of a Speckled Bush-Cricket Leptophyes punctatissima (6) could be found sunning itself on a bramble leaf. Purple Bells
Cinderhill, Brenchley, Kent, England
Working on heath during the summer cab be hot and tiring work, full sun with little shade it makes the perfect habitat for a number of specialist species.
Sadly much of the heath is being smothered by Bracken Pteridium aquilinum, so every year a team of volunteers attempt to help reduce it vigorous hold and return it back to the heather.
Although it was to early for the Ling Calluna vulgaris to be in flower, Bell Heather Erica cinerea (4) was putting on a beautiful show, it’s Latin name cinerea, means ashen and describes it’s wood stems. The dazzle camouflaged caterpillars of the Beautiful Yellow Underwing Anarta myrtilli (5) could be found feeding busily on the plants leaves whilst the White-Legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes (2) could often be found resting on its stems. Growing up through the canopy of heather were the white snowflake flowers of Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (7) and the tall elegant heads of Common St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum (3), the flowers are edible and taste quite nice and were once used as a cure for depression. A single nymph of a Speckled Bush-Cricket Leptophyes punctatissima (6) could be found sunning itself on a bramble leaf. Purple Bells
Cinderhill, Brenchley, Kent, England
Working on heath during the summer cab be hot and tiring work, full sun with little shade it makes the perfect habitat for a number of specialist species.
Sadly much of the heath is being smothered by Bracken Pteridium aquilinum, so every year a team of volunteers attempt to help reduce it vigorous hold and return it back to the heather.
Although it was to early for the Ling Calluna vulgaris to be in flower, Bell Heather Erica cinerea (4) was putting on a beautiful show, it’s Latin name cinerea, means ashen and describes it’s wood stems. The dazzle camouflaged caterpillars of the Beautiful Yellow Underwing Anarta myrtilli (5) could be found feeding busily on the plants leaves whilst the White-Legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes (2) could often be found resting on its stems. Growing up through the canopy of heather were the white snowflake flowers of Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (7) and the tall elegant heads of Common St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum (3), the flowers are edible and taste quite nice and were once used as a cure for depression. A single nymph of a Speckled Bush-Cricket Leptophyes punctatissima (6) could be found sunning itself on a bramble leaf. Purple Bells
Cinderhill, Brenchley, Kent, England
Working on heath during the summer cab be hot and tiring work, full sun with little shade it makes the perfect habitat for a number of specialist species.
Sadly much of the heath is being smothered by Bracken Pteridium aquilinum, so every year a team of volunteers attempt to help reduce it vigorous hold and return it back to the heather.
Although it was to early for the Ling Calluna vulgaris to be in flower, Bell Heather Erica cinerea (4) was putting on a beautiful show, it’s Latin name cinerea, means ashen and describes it’s wood stems. The dazzle camouflaged caterpillars of the Beautiful Yellow Underwing Anarta myrtilli (5) could be found feeding busily on the plants leaves whilst the White-Legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes (2) could often be found resting on its stems. Growing up through the canopy of heather were the white snowflake flowers of Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (7) and the tall elegant heads of Common St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum (3), the flowers are edible and taste quite nice and were once used as a cure for depression. A single nymph of a Speckled Bush-Cricket Leptophyes punctatissima (6) could be found sunning itself on a bramble leaf. Purple Bells
Cinderhill, Brenchley, Kent, England
Working on heath during the summer cab be hot and tiring work, full sun with little shade it makes the perfect habitat for a number of specialist species.
Sadly much of the heath is being smothered by Bracken Pteridium aquilinum, so every year a team of volunteers attempt to help reduce it vigorous hold and return it back to the heather.
Although it was to early for the Ling Calluna vulgaris to be in flower, Bell Heather Erica cinerea (4) was putting on a beautiful show, it’s Latin name cinerea, means ashen and describes it’s wood stems. The dazzle camouflaged caterpillars of the Beautiful Yellow Underwing Anarta myrtilli (5) could be found feeding busily on the plants leaves whilst the White-Legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes (2) could often be found resting on its stems. Growing up through the canopy of heather were the white snowflake flowers of Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (7) and the tall elegant heads of Common St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum (3), the flowers are edible and taste quite nice and were once used as a cure for depression. A single nymph of a Speckled Bush-Cricket Leptophyes punctatissima (6) could be found sunning itself on a bramble leaf. Purple Bells
Cinderhill, Brenchley, Kent, England
Working on heath during the summer cab be hot and tiring work, full sun with little shade it makes the perfect habitat for a number of specialist species.
Sadly much of the heath is being smothered by Bracken Pteridium aquilinum, so every year a team of volunteers attempt to help reduce it vigorous hold and return it back to the heather.
Although it was to early for the Ling Calluna vulgaris to be in flower, Bell Heather Erica cinerea (4) was putting on a beautiful show, it’s Latin name cinerea, means ashen and describes it’s wood stems. The dazzle camouflaged caterpillars of the Beautiful Yellow Underwing Anarta myrtilli (5) could be found feeding busily on the plants leaves whilst the White-Legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes (2) could often be found resting on its stems. Growing up through the canopy of heather were the white snowflake flowers of Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (7) and the tall elegant heads of Common St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum (3), the flowers are edible and taste quite nice and were once used as a cure for depression. A single nymph of a Speckled Bush-Cricket Leptophyes punctatissima (6) could be found sunning itself on a bramble leaf. Purple Bells
Cinderhill, Brenchley, Kent, England
Working on heath during the summer cab be hot and tiring work, full sun with little shade it makes the perfect habitat for a number of specialist species.
Sadly much of the heath is being smothered by Bracken Pteridium aquilinum, so every year a team of volunteers attempt to help reduce it vigorous hold and return it back to the heather.
Although it was to early for the Ling Calluna vulgaris to be in flower, Bell Heather Erica cinerea (4) was putting on a beautiful show, it’s Latin name cinerea, means ashen and describes it’s wood stems. The dazzle camouflaged caterpillars of the Beautiful Yellow Underwing Anarta myrtilli (5) could be found feeding busily on the plants leaves whilst the White-Legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes (2) could often be found resting on its stems. Growing up through the canopy of heather were the white snowflake flowers of Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (7) and the tall elegant heads of Common St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum (3), the flowers are edible and taste quite nice and were once used as a cure for depression. A single nymph of a Speckled Bush-Cricket Leptophyes punctatissima (6) could be found sunning itself on a bramble leaf. Purple Bells
Cinderhill, Brenchley, Kent, England
Working on heath during the summer cab be hot and tiring work, full sun with little shade it makes the perfect habitat for a number of specialist species.
Sadly much of the heath is being smothered by Bracken Pteridium aquilinum, so every year a team of volunteers attempt to help reduce it vigorous hold and return it back to the heather.
Although it was to early for the Ling Calluna vulgaris to be in flower, Bell Heather Erica cinerea (4) was putting on a beautiful show, it’s Latin name cinerea, means ashen and describes it’s wood stems. The dazzle camouflaged caterpillars of the Beautiful Yellow Underwing Anarta myrtilli (5) could be found feeding busily on the plants leaves whilst the White-Legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes (2) could often be found resting on its stems. Growing up through the canopy of heather were the white snowflake flowers of Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (7) and the tall elegant heads of Common St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum (3), the flowers are edible and taste quite nice and were once used as a cure for depression. A single nymph of a Speckled Bush-Cricket Leptophyes punctatissima (6) could be found sunning itself on a bramble leaf.

Purple Bells

Cinderhill, Brenchley, Kent, England

Working on heath during the summer cab be hot and tiring work, full sun with little shade it makes the perfect habitat for a number of specialist species.

Sadly much of the heath is being smothered by Bracken Pteridium aquilinum, so every year a team of volunteers attempt to help reduce it vigorous hold and return it back to the heather.

Although it was to early for the Ling Calluna vulgaris to be in flower, Bell Heather Erica cinerea (4) was putting on a beautiful show, it’s Latin name cinerea, means ashen and describes it’s wood stems. The dazzle camouflaged caterpillars of the Beautiful Yellow Underwing Anarta myrtilli (5) could be found feeding busily on the plants leaves whilst the White-Legged Damselfly Platycnemis pennipes (2) could often be found resting on its stems.

Growing up through the canopy of heather were the white snowflake flowers of Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (7) and the tall elegant heads of Common St John’s Wort Hypericum perforatum (3), the flowers are edible and taste quite nice and were once used as a cure for depression. A single nymph of a Speckled Bush-Cricket Leptophyes punctatissima (6) could be found sunning itself on a bramble leaf.

Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.
Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.
Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.
Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.
Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.
Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.
Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.
Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.
Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.
Beneath the Scots Pine
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.
Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs. 
Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.

Beneath the Scots Pine

Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England

It wasn’t quite all hard work over the summer, an afternoon spent wandering around looking for some dormice boxes with the work experience really isn’t the worst way to spend half a day, although sadly we didn’t find any mice there was still plenty to find.

Beneath a log pile, a very aggressive Woodlouse Spider Dysdera crocata (2) allowed me to get some cracking shots of it in defense mode. Under another log a female Smooth Newt Lissotriton vulgaris (3) could be found. Newts are largely terrestrial during late summer and autumn once there breeding season is over and spend the winter hibernating under logs.

Around a pond hidden in a small glade in the wood, large numbers of Common Spotted Orchid Dactylorhiza fuchsii (9)(10) could be found, along with a few Red Clover Trifolium pratense (6) plants. These were joined by two species of butterfly which were busy feeding and warming themselves in the sunshine, the beautifully marked Ringlet Aphantopus hyperantus (8) could be found in large numbers, as could the Large Skipper Ochlodes sylvanus (7). The pond itself was full of White Water-Lilies Nymphaea alba (5) which were once used used by nuns and monks as a anaphrodisiac. A single Four-Spotted Chaser Libellula quadrimaculata (4) could be found patrolling the edge of the pond.

Mr Toad
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
A busy day working at Sherwood produced another Common Toad Bufo bufo (all photos) which came out of a pile of woodchip,this one was marked with almost orangey-brown markings on it’s greeny-brown body, making this one a particularly beautiful looking toad.
Toads can be told apart from frogs in several ways, rather than hop, toads will crawl. Unlike frogs a toad has a pair of toxin glands on the top of it’s head which help to protect it from predators. 
It’s always a good to find toads since they are under threat in UK, Old ponds which they have bred in for generations have been filled in, destroying their habitat. Roads cause further problems in spring when many toads are run over trying to return to their breeding ponds. Research has suggested that they have declined by up to 50% in central and southern England and they have been placed onto the UKBAP list to help turn this around. Mr Toad
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
A busy day working at Sherwood produced another Common Toad Bufo bufo (all photos) which came out of a pile of woodchip,this one was marked with almost orangey-brown markings on it’s greeny-brown body, making this one a particularly beautiful looking toad.
Toads can be told apart from frogs in several ways, rather than hop, toads will crawl. Unlike frogs a toad has a pair of toxin glands on the top of it’s head which help to protect it from predators. 
It’s always a good to find toads since they are under threat in UK, Old ponds which they have bred in for generations have been filled in, destroying their habitat. Roads cause further problems in spring when many toads are run over trying to return to their breeding ponds. Research has suggested that they have declined by up to 50% in central and southern England and they have been placed onto the UKBAP list to help turn this around.

Mr Toad

Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England

A busy day working at Sherwood produced another Common Toad Bufo bufo (all photos) which came out of a pile of woodchip,this one was marked with almost orangey-brown markings on it’s greeny-brown body, making this one a particularly beautiful looking toad.

Toads can be told apart from frogs in several ways, rather than hop, toads will crawl. Unlike frogs a toad has a pair of toxin glands on the top of it’s head which help to protect it from predators. 

It’s always a good to find toads since they are under threat in UK, Old ponds which they have bred in for generations have been filled in, destroying their habitat. Roads cause further problems in spring when many toads are run over trying to return to their breeding ponds. Research has suggested that they have declined by up to 50% in central and southern England and they have been placed onto the UKBAP list to help turn this around.

High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye. High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye. High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye. High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye. High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye. High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye. High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye. High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye. High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye. High Summer In An English Hay Meadow
Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England
I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.
There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.
First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.
Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye.

High Summer In An English Hay Meadow

Marden Meadows, Marden, Kent, England

I don’t think I have ever been to the meadow during the middle of summer but it was well worth the visit.

There were still plenty of flowering plants to view in the long scraggy grass as well as a good number of birds, many of which had just been kicked out of the nest.

First up was a family of Blue Tits Cyanistes caeruleus (9), which included an adult and several youngsters. From one of the large dead oaks on the reserve the tell tale call of a European Nuthatch Sitta europaea (10) led me to a group of youngsters which were busy calling to be fed.

Down in the long grass many different species of plant and insect could be found. A Cinnabar Moth Tyria jacobaeae (2) looked for a suitable place to lay it’s eggs. A single Ground Bug Melanocoryphus superbus (7) could also be found climbing up a grass stem. Of the flowering plants Yellow Rattle Rhinanthus minor (3) and Moon Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (6) were the most abundant. Less common were Burnet-Saxifrage Pimpinella saxifraga (4) and Dyer’s Greenweed Genista tinctoria (8) which was once used to produce a yellow dye.

Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).
Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).
Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).
Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).
Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).
Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).
Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).
Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).
Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).
Sandy GrasslandsCamber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.
A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.
The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.
In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.
The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).

Sandy Grasslands
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England

The last stage of the dune formation at Camber, are the dune slacks. These areas are very botanically rich due to the increased water availability and calcium rich soils.

A few scrubby areas were infested with Sea Buckthorn Hippophae rhamnoides (1), this common successional species can be found throughout the UK and it’s berries which are high in vitamin C are often used in herbal medicine.

The tall dry slopes of the old dunes, provided the right habitat for Wild Asparagus Asparagus officinalis (4) and Crow Garlic Allium vineale (2) to grow, Asparagus has been eaten since at least 3000BC and a recipe for it can be found in the oldest surviving book of recipes, Apicius de re coquinaria from the 3rd century AD.

In the slacks at the bottom of the slopes, many different types of clover could be found growing, these included the common White Clover Trifolium repens (3) which was being busily fed on by a large number of Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (3), the more specialist species which could be found were Hare’s-Foot Clover Trifolium arvense (9) and the related Hop Trefoil Trifolium campestre (5). One other sulfur yellow species could also be found, Lady’s Bedstraw Galium verum (10) which was once used as a sedative in Scandinavia.

The most striking flower came in the form of an orchid, the Pyramidal Orchid Anacamptis pyramidalis (7)(8) who’s deep purple flowers spikes were fairly common in the longer grass. The pyramidal orchid reproduces by attaching it’s pollen to the proboscis of butterflies such as the Common Blue Polyommatus icarus (6).

The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond… The Beauty of Red Fescue
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.
Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.
Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).
One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).
Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond…

The Beauty of Red Fescue

Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England

Moving back from the fore dunes you eventually reach the dune slacks, these sheltered areas are protected from the worst of the sea breeze and the salt found with in the blowing winds.

Here Red Fescue Festuca rubra (background of 7,8,9) is the dominant grass species, which had dried to a beautiful red colour with the ripening of the seed heads. These in turn were the attraction for large flocks of birds, such as Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (4) to the abundant feast.

Many flowering plants could also be found, the tall, slim, elegant stems of Welted Thistle Carduus crispus (10) were common, along with the sprawling runners of Brambles Rubus fruticosa (5) which were providing nectar to a pair of Long Horn Beetles Stictoleptura rubra (5).

One of the more showy flowers belonged to Viper’s Bugloss Echium vulgare (1)(2)(3), this common coastal plant is normal a purply-blue colour but one individual was completely white. Like the bramble, it was also providing nectar for a Small Skipper Thymelicus sylvestris (2).

Mixed in between the beautiful red seedheads of grass, the large showy flowers of Sea Bindweed Calystegia soldanella (8) could be found, along with the beautiful golden yellow of Biting Stonecrop Sedum acre (9) and Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (7). One last tiny plant could also be found in this area of the dunes, the Small-Flowered Cranebill Geranium pusillum (6) but then it was time to move back even further into the sandy grasslands that lay beyond…

Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3). Sands of Life
Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England
Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.
The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 
Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.
Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3).

Sands of Life

Camber Sands, Camber, East Sussex, England

Camber Sands is the place to be when the sun is shining, although sadly you don’t get the beach to yourself, but if you wander down to the far end it’s much quieter and more botanically interesting.

The dunes at Camber are a cuspate foreland dune system which has developed over a series of shingle ridges, it’s fore dunes hold typical dune building grass species such as Sand Couch Elytrigia juncea (9, front left hand side) and Marram Ammophila arenaria (9). 

Flowering plants also included typical species such as Sea Rocket Cakile maritima (6), Sea Sandwort Honckenya peploides (5) and Frosted Orache Atriplex laciniata (8) which were all growing just above the high tide mark.

Further into the more stabilized dunes, Ephemeral weed species such as Creeping Thistle Cirsium arvense (3) and Bittersweet Solanum dulcamara (2) which were  being regularly visited by the stunningly marked Common Green Colonel Oplodontha viridula (3).

Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal. Snake In The Grass
Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England
A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.
A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.
In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 
One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal.

Snake In The Grass

Bedgebury Pinetum, Bedgebury, Kent, England

A quick wander about during my lunch break through some of the meadows at Bedgebury proved worthwhile.

A patch of disturbed soil had a few scraggly Wild Radish Raphanus raphanistrum (2), which isn’t a true native but has been present since the bronze age when it was bought over by early farmers.

In areas with slightly longer grass Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3) and Smooth Tare Vicia tetrasperma (9) were common along with Meadow Grasshoppers Chorthippus parallelus (10) and Gatekeeper Butterflies Pyronia tithonus (4), whilst the slightly damper areas, which were thick with rushes, had large numbers of Marsh Thistle Cirsium palustre (7)(8) and a few Skullcap Scutellaria galericulata (1). 

One slightly odd highlight was the discovery of dead Grass Snake Natrix natrix (5) which was still held together by some skin, allowing you to see how the skeleton looks on the live animal.

Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.
Recreation Ground
Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England
It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.
Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 
One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.
I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.

Recreation Ground

Hawkenbury Recreation Ground, Hawkenbury, Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England

It’s not often I’d wander round a park looking for flora and fauna but with a phase 1 survey needing to be conducted I needed to take a closer look.

Although much of the site was mown there was still a large majority that was kept long and still had some nice acid grassland present around the site. Many of the species found were common grassland plants such as White Clover Trifolium repens (5) and Bird’s-Foot Trefoil Lotus corniculatus (6), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (10), Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (4), Bugle Ajuga reptans (2) and Heath Bedstraw Galium saxatile (9). 

One common wasteland plant, Common Mallow Malva sylvestris (4) was present around some of the buildings, particularly on some disturbed ground. It has mildly seeds which were once eaten by country children although they are fiddly to collect in any quantity. It’s leaves are used in the middle eastern dish, Molukhia, where they are finely shredded.

I only saw one insect of note during my visit, a Spotted Longhorn Beetle Rutpela maculata (8) which can commonly be found feeding on the nectar of plant species.

Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place. Purple Scripture
Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 
Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 
Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.
A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place.

Purple Scripture

Lamberhurst Down, Lamberhurst, Kent, England 

Although it is nothing more than a triangle of green between 3 roads the small patch of meadow holds a secret which is only revealed in early summer. 

Almost a hundred Common-Spotted Orchids Dactylorhiza fuchsii (1)(2)(4)(7)(8) grow on this remnant of land which would have once been commonplace across a large majority of the UK, sadly mechanization and changes in farming practice’s have reduced the amount of habitat by 97%, more and more roadside verges and greenspaces are becoming important for plants and wildlife.

A few other species could be found including Lesser Stitchwort Stellaria graminea (3), Common Hawkweed Hieracium lachenalii (5) and Black Knapweed Centaurea nigra (6) which proves the diversity which can be found in even a small place.

Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries. Flowers Of the Dam
Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England
Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.
The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.
Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries.

Flowers Of the Dam

Sherwood Lake, Sherwood, Tunbridge Wells , Kent, England

Once the dam was repaired, a wildflower seed mix was sown to create a meadow, the mix was a native mix although a few introduced species also came up this summer.

The tall elegant flower spikes of Purple Toadflax Linaria purpurea (1) is one example, it was first introduced in 1640’s from the Mediterranean and has grown in the wild ever since. Many of the plants can trace their history of introduction back even further to the Bronze age when their seeds were brought over by early farmers, Corn Chamomile Anthemis arvensis (2) and Corn Marigold Glebionis segetum (3) and Common Poppy Papaver rhoeas (10) are tree of these species which although once common with the changing of agriculture they are now becoming rare.

Amongst the native species,Oxeye Daisy Leucanthemum vulgare (4) with its large showy flowers was particularly common, whilst the smaller White Campion Silene latifolia (2) with its bladder like flowers could be found in a few places. A large majority of the grass found on the dam was Crested Dog’s-Tail Grass Cynosurus cristatus (6), a common meadow grass whilst the under-story was made up of a range of clovers and Black Medick Medicago lupulina (8). One much taller non-native member of the Legume family could also be found, Ribbed Melliot Melilotus officinalis is native to southern Europe but has been used as a green manure in the UK for centuries.